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Posts Tagged ‘R.D. Burman’

kati

kati-patang

Finally I’ve gotten around to seeing Asha Parekh in a film with 1970’s Kati Patang. I even love the title, which the subtitles translate to Guideless Kite. I know I feel like a guideless kite a lot of the time, so that title spoke to me. How about you? I loved the film right off the bat, since within the first few minutes there’s lots of drama. Lovely Asha is just about to get married when she opens the gift from her former flame and reads:

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Now how great is THAT? Way to guilt trip her! Plus even better, should the future bring me a situation where I’m in love with a Hindu man who is just about to walk around that marriage fire 7 X with his new bride and not me, his true love, I can easily plagiarize that for my own dialogue. “But when you go around the holy fire with your wife, think this to be a funeral pyre of my love. Yours, and all the best! Sita-ji.” I don’t want to spoil the movie in any way, but let’s just say some stuff goes down shortly after this wedding scene which results in seeing the big nahin. Another reason to love the film for me. I love hearing nahin screamed as much as I love to be surprised by seeing a tight slap to the face.

kati-patangnahin

Yet another thing I like in Hindi films is to frequency of limb amputation. Remember that Sholay, Lawaaris, and Mother India all have double arm amputations, which always makes me think of insurance dismemberment clauses. You may also remember the limb amputations parodied in Om Shanti Om. I know I’ve seen other Bollywood films with limb amputations, but I can’t remember others right now, so I welcome your comments if you remember any others.

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Then for even more pleasure, I get to be simultaneously repulsed and attracted to Prem Chopra. I am grossed out by Prem’s character, yet also strangely attracted to the sleaziness, evidenced by the his open shirts, chest hair and large medallion. Yuck! Yet I must see more! See his effect of Bindu’s character? She just hangs on him. She can’t help it. In addition to his medallion, his glasses are noteworthy.

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I’m seeing what I like in Kati Patang, the same stuff I see repeatedly in these Bollywood films: the drama, the big nahin, sleazy bad guys and gals, amputations, misunderstandings, and coincidences. Then there’s the requisite item girl number with outlandish costuming and suggestive choreography, but this time I am startled more than usual. I invite you to watch Bindu in the scary and captivating number Mera Naam Hai Shabnam, with music by R. D. Burnam and playback singer Asha Bhonsle. The choreography is by Surya Kumar. Surya, hats off to your work. Unfortunately, the only quality footage I could find from this song for now is rather short, so see the entire film with the complete song, which involves Bindu rolling around on the ground a lot. Now dosto, I dare you NOT to have the same expression and reaction that Asha Parekh’s character has when you watch Bindu’s dance, because I know I shared Asha’s response, “I can’t believe this is happening. NO WAY!”

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This ARTICLE states that, “Overnight Kati Patang turned Bindu into the hottest dancer in movie town.” I can certainly understand why that was true. Now if you’d like to read more on the film, head over to memsaabstory.

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Dosto, I recently watched Namak Haaram (1973). Fabulous! Here are the basics:

Namak Haraam (Devanagari: नमक हराम, Nastaliq: نمک ہرام, is a 1973 Indian Hindi film directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee. The music is by R.D. Burman and the lyrics by Anand Bakshi. The film stars Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan. The film also stars Rekha, Asrani, Raza Murad, A.K. Hangal, Simi Garewal and Om Shivpuri . The film focused on two friends ( Rajesh and Amitabh) and how Rajesh tries to infiltrate the trade union of his friends. (wikipedia)

For a more coherent and substantial review of the film, check out rediff.com and Memsaab Story. I will of course deal with the superficial. I like to eat the frosting more than the cake, so first feast your eyes on this screen capture of our beloved Amitabh from the film which should be titled state of the art:

All starts out well with rich Vikram (Amit-ji) and super BFF, Somu (Rajesh Khanna) hanging around, wearing matching outfits, living the good life. They visit hot nautch girls and drink whiskey. Looking at Jayshree T. here it’s understandable why these guys would like to just hang out and be entertained.

But people in town talk, (haters!) and they are starting to call Somu Vikram’s spoon. Say What? I had never heard this phrase before, and I love when something like this comes up in a movie. I start to wonder is it: a.) a term I’ve just never heard of in English?; b.) Is this a British English term?; c.) Is this a Hindi figure of speech translated directly into English? Whatever it is I LOVE it. I ain’t nobody’s spoon! I take that being someone’s spoon means to be their flunkie, stooge, yes man, or dare I say, as used in the streets, their bitch? Anyway, the point seems to be that a spoon blindly follows someone who has more perceived power than the spoon does. Hindi speakers, please, I welcome your corrections to my interpretation of the term spoon if I’ve got it wrong. Somu’s sister tells him about what people are saying and he sets her straight!

Oh snap! Oh no he didn’t say that! So fast forward, Vicky has to go manage his father’s factory and his spoon, I mean Somu, tags along. They cook up a plan that Somu will infiltrate the factory, first posing as a worker and then eventually working his way up to, you’d never guess, a union organizer. Tricky! Somu eventually understands the struggle of the factory workers.

I adore seeing Johnnie Walker in these Bollywood films, and here it is, the extra fancy black label used to symbolize the good life, and its potential for arrogance. Somu tries to tell Vicky that it’s useful to try and call the low caste workers by their names:

Somu becomes so touched by the day to day struggles of the common worker that becomes a traitor, or as was written in the movie’s subtitles, namak haraam, to his friend Vicky, switching his loyalty from his friend to the workers. Namak haraam literally seems to translate to food/salt that’s not OK to eat, not sanctioned, not clean, not pure, not halaal, but figuratively the term means traitor. Once again, over some whiskey, Somu tries to make rich Vicky understand:

I know, I know, I already used this photo in yesterday’s post, but it’s so great I had to use it twice.  Can you blame me?

These socialists are such buzz kills! Eventually Vicky learns the wisdom of Somu’s ways. When Vicky finds out of Somu’s trouble, which you’ll have to watch the movie to find out about, he shows a delicious taste of angry Amitabh:

Namak Haraam is art imitating life as evidenced here. Doesn’t this sound a bit too familiar now:

Well since elections are coming soon here in the U S of A, here’s a timely song from the film titled Woh Jhoota Hai Vote Na Usko Dena, picturized on Asrani and a hot young Rekha, with music by R. D. Bruman. You can check it out HERE.

And speaking of voting…I’m so excited to present my first poll on the blog! So here I ask you the impossible question: Would you rather be a Namak Haraam or a spoon?

extra credit:

When looking up Namak Haraam online, I came across Arun Krishan’s clever podcast on his site, Cutting Chai, Learn Hindi from Bollywood Movies, since in it he credits a tune from the film in the music credits. You will certainly enjoy this, as well as all his other great podcasts:

Episode 47. Alcohol. Is alcoholism such a bad thing?

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seeta1.jpgLike yesterday’s clip, here’s another from Seeta Aur Geeta (1972). Today enjoy the action packed “O Saathi Chal” sung by playback singers extraordinaire, Kishore Kumar and Asha Bhosle, music by the incomparable R.D. Burman. Here Ravi (Sanjeev Kumar) and Geeta (Hema Malini) skate down a mountain. A typical date, right? Watch carefully as Geeta seems to turn into a big man in a wig during the more daring scenes. I think it’s the best part of the movie.

 

Thanks to UsherRed for the video.

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Like Nandini described in yesterday’s post, I’ve also had a blockbuster week of watching Bollywood movies. In the past week I’ve seen, Debshishu, King Uncle, Haathi Mere Saathi, Amar Akbar Anthony, Cheeni Kum, Guide, Seeta aur Geeta, and Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander. It’s a rather bizarre mix of flicks. I’m drunk on this Bollywood binge, so today’s video fits the bill: “Haan Ji Haan Maine Sharaab Pi Hai” from Seeta aur Geeta. seeta_aur_geeta_1972_film_poster.jpg

Seeta aur Geeta (सीता औरगीता) is a 1972 Hindi film directed by Ramesh Sippy. The story is by Salim-Javed and the music by R.D. Burman. The story is about identical twins (played by Hema Malini) who are separated at birth and grow up with different temperaments. The twins then swap places (like The Prince and the Pauper). Hema’s two partners in the movie are played by Dharmendra and Sanjeev Kumar. Manorama excels in her role as the evil aunt who changes her tune after her arm is twisted (literally). (wikipedia)

Filmi geek has a nice write up on the movie. “Haan Ji Haan Maine Sharaab Pi Hai,” is sung by Lata Mangeshkar, with music by R.D.Burman, and lyrics by Anand Bakshi.

UsherRed‘s YouTube video is dubbed in Russian, which adds another layer to its already great appeal. In this clip poor Geeta, is set to get married, and is scheming to get out of it because she’s guilty that her fiancé mistakenly thinks she’s really Seeta. She trys to imagine the worst case senario, which involves a tight slap to the face, and wiggles her way out of that situation, or does she? Here’s how she figures she’ll be able to sidestep the shaadi:

I’m particularly fond of this scene because I had a pair of white patten leather go-go boots I wore when I was about five years old, just like Hema is sporting here.   It’s also impressive that she never spills even a drop of her sharaab in this scene.

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asha.jpgHere’s a good song to put on a loop for home cleaning inspiration:

Asha Bhosle singing 1 2 Cha Cha Cha” from Asha Reveals Real RD.

The album pays homage to her late husband. The song is from the movie Shalimar (1978). Thanks Punjab Central!

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Here’s the title song from Yaadon Ki Baaraat. Sing along to R.D. Burman’s song with playback superstars Kishore Kumar & Mohammed Rafi.

Yaadon Ki Baaraat Nikhali” courtesy of Hindi Lyrics:

Kishore: Yaadon Ki Baraat Nikjli Hai Aaj Dil Ke Dwaare, Dil Ke Dwaareyaadonkibaaraat.jpg

Yaadon Ki Baraat Nikjli Hai Aaj Dil Ke Dwaare, Dil Ke Dwaare

Sapnon Ki Shehnaai Beete Dinon Ko Pukare, Dil Ke Dwaare

Ho Chhedo Taraane Milan Ke Pyare Pyare, Sang Hamare

Badle Na Apna Yeh Aalam Kabhi

Jeevan Mein Bichhdenge Na Hum Kabhi

Ho Badle Na Apna Yeh Aalam Kabhi

Jeevan Mein Bichhdenge Na Hum Kabhi

Rafi: Badle Na Apna Yeh Aalam Kabhi

Jeevan Mein Bichhdenge Na Hum Kabhi

Ho Badle Na Apna Yeh Aalam Kabhi

Jeevan Mein Bichhdenge Na Hum Kabhi

Yoon Bhi Jaaoge Aakhir Kahan Hoke Hamare

Both: Yaadon Ki Baraat Nikjli Hai Aaj Dil Ke Dwaare, Dil Ke Dwaare

Sapnon Ki Shehnaai Beete Dinon Ko Pukare, Dil Ke Dwaare

Rafi: Aage Bhi Hoga Jo Uska Karam

Kishore: Yeh Din To Manaayenge Har Saal Hum

Rafi: Apne Aangan Nachen Gaayenge Chanda Sitaare

Both: Yaadon Ki Baraat Nikjli Hai Aaj Dil Ke Dwaare, Dil Ke Dwaare

Sapnon Ki Shehnaai Beete Dinon Ko Pukare, Dil Ke Dwaare

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Today’s song is “Chura Liya Hai” – from Yaadon Ki Baaraat (1973).  I saw this film within a film (Swades) and was more curious to see it, so I did and loved it!yadon.jpg

The film uses the familiar Bollywood theme of siblings separated by fate. Gangland killers assassinate an honest man who defied them, killing his wife as well. The couple’s three sons flee the massacre and lose contact with each other. They grow up in entirely different circumstances and are re-united only when one of the sons, played by Dharmendra, sets out to find the villain who killed their parents….Their only hope of reuniting is by remembering the song their mother had taught them… Yaadon Ki Baaraat. (wikipedia)

Enjoy this easy listening, yet passionate R.D. Burman tune, with Asha Bhosle singing playback and  Zeenat Aman pretending to sing. Male playback vocals by Mohammed Rafi.

Thanks to  jazzyaj  for the video.

“Chura Liya Hai”  Lyrics in Hindi with English translation

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