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Posts Tagged ‘Johnnie Walker’

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As promised in yesterday’s post, I present you with more lovely images from Sawan Bhadon (1970).

Enjoy these images of the luminous and lusciouss Jayshree T. .

How could I narrow down the choices?  I couldn’t, so I’m posting them all.

Here is Jayshre T.’s  first performance in the film at the den of sin, as evidenced by the bottle of Johnnie Walker, red label.  At this point she is under the impression that she is being admired just for her dancing.


sawanbhadonjayshreetjohnniewalkerIt’s really not Bollywood for me until I see that bottle of Johnnie Walker and see someone slapped in the face.

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To listen to the song  that go with these images, as well as all the music from the film, check this download at Music From The Third Floor.

 

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Dosto, I recently watched Namak Haaram (1973). Fabulous! Here are the basics:

Namak Haraam (Devanagari: नमक हराम, Nastaliq: نمک ہرام, is a 1973 Indian Hindi film directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee. The music is by R.D. Burman and the lyrics by Anand Bakshi. The film stars Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan. The film also stars Rekha, Asrani, Raza Murad, A.K. Hangal, Simi Garewal and Om Shivpuri . The film focused on two friends ( Rajesh and Amitabh) and how Rajesh tries to infiltrate the trade union of his friends. (wikipedia)

For a more coherent and substantial review of the film, check out rediff.com and Memsaab Story. I will of course deal with the superficial. I like to eat the frosting more than the cake, so first feast your eyes on this screen capture of our beloved Amitabh from the film which should be titled state of the art:

All starts out well with rich Vikram (Amit-ji) and super BFF, Somu (Rajesh Khanna) hanging around, wearing matching outfits, living the good life. They visit hot nautch girls and drink whiskey. Looking at Jayshree T. here it’s understandable why these guys would like to just hang out and be entertained.

But people in town talk, (haters!) and they are starting to call Somu Vikram’s spoon. Say What? I had never heard this phrase before, and I love when something like this comes up in a movie. I start to wonder is it: a.) a term I’ve just never heard of in English?; b.) Is this a British English term?; c.) Is this a Hindi figure of speech translated directly into English? Whatever it is I LOVE it. I ain’t nobody’s spoon! I take that being someone’s spoon means to be their flunkie, stooge, yes man, or dare I say, as used in the streets, their bitch? Anyway, the point seems to be that a spoon blindly follows someone who has more perceived power than the spoon does. Hindi speakers, please, I welcome your corrections to my interpretation of the term spoon if I’ve got it wrong. Somu’s sister tells him about what people are saying and he sets her straight!

Oh snap! Oh no he didn’t say that! So fast forward, Vicky has to go manage his father’s factory and his spoon, I mean Somu, tags along. They cook up a plan that Somu will infiltrate the factory, first posing as a worker and then eventually working his way up to, you’d never guess, a union organizer. Tricky! Somu eventually understands the struggle of the factory workers.

I adore seeing Johnnie Walker in these Bollywood films, and here it is, the extra fancy black label used to symbolize the good life, and its potential for arrogance. Somu tries to tell Vicky that it’s useful to try and call the low caste workers by their names:

Somu becomes so touched by the day to day struggles of the common worker that becomes a traitor, or as was written in the movie’s subtitles, namak haraam, to his friend Vicky, switching his loyalty from his friend to the workers. Namak haraam literally seems to translate to food/salt that’s not OK to eat, not sanctioned, not clean, not pure, not halaal, but figuratively the term means traitor. Once again, over some whiskey, Somu tries to make rich Vicky understand:

I know, I know, I already used this photo in yesterday’s post, but it’s so great I had to use it twice.  Can you blame me?

These socialists are such buzz kills! Eventually Vicky learns the wisdom of Somu’s ways. When Vicky finds out of Somu’s trouble, which you’ll have to watch the movie to find out about, he shows a delicious taste of angry Amitabh:

Namak Haraam is art imitating life as evidenced here. Doesn’t this sound a bit too familiar now:

Well since elections are coming soon here in the U S of A, here’s a timely song from the film titled Woh Jhoota Hai Vote Na Usko Dena, picturized on Asrani and a hot young Rekha, with music by R. D. Bruman. You can check it out HERE.

And speaking of voting…I’m so excited to present my first poll on the blog! So here I ask you the impossible question: Would you rather be a Namak Haraam or a spoon?

extra credit:

When looking up Namak Haraam online, I came across Arun Krishan’s clever podcast on his site, Cutting Chai, Learn Hindi from Bollywood Movies, since in it he credits a tune from the film in the music credits. You will certainly enjoy this, as well as all his other great podcasts:

Episode 47. Alcohol. Is alcoholism such a bad thing?

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My blog dosto, I have missed you! I have been ignoring this blog since my last post about Bally Sagoo coming to Minneapolis. I attended the show with blog poster Brahmanadam, who was kind enough to purchase VIP tickets. With the fancy VIP tickets came a meet and greet with babuji Bally Sagoo. Since the picture was less than flattering of me and my friend, I had to do a little bit of subtle editing. Bally Sagoo looks cool, as expected.

So what does one say at a meet-n-greet? Well first off, we all had a drink of Johnnie Walker in celebration of the occasion, then I wasn’t sure what to say, so I said this:

Sita-ji: Sat Sri Akaal Bhai Sahib!

Bally Sagoo: Hi.

Sitai-ji: So you must really hate this part.

Bally Sagoo: No I love it, it’s great! (said with sincerity)

Sitai-ji: So do you have any questions about Minneapolis that I can answer?

Bally Sagoo: No.

Sitai-ji: Hey I saw on the internet that you and your wife do feng shui. That’s cool.

Then we moved on and the next people had their picture taken with Bally Sagoo, and so on, and so on. Now that I reflect on this awkward event, I think that maybe you’re supposed to be quiet and smile and have your picture taken. Next time I’ll do that if I ever have to participate in a celebrity to civilian meet and greet. Had I known that Bally Sagoo was in a movie, Sajna Ve Sajna, out now on DVD, I would have brought a copy to sign. Here’s how his website describes the film:

Bally (Bally Sagoo) lives the life as the spoiled Grandson of Multi-millionaire Kartar Singh (Dalip Tahil). His aspirations are to conquer the world with his band Desi Fever and marry his long-term girl friend Charlene (Zoë Szypillo) Will Charlene be able to fit in as a daughter-in-law within a respected Panjabi family? What about Manpreet who sacrificed her own love so that Bally could have his way? Can the two different cultures meet eye to eye?

Yes, two different cultures can meet eye to eye. The show was very melodious and funky and Bally had a sidekick Sikh hype man next to him all night. Who was this guy? Was he a friend? A relative? Bodyguard? Maybe he was all of those things, but whoever he was, he sure seemed to have fun and enjoyed Bally’s expert Djing, as did the hipster desi crowd. There even was the required groupie gracing the stage all evening.

You can see more images from Bally Sagoo’s 9.19.08 Minneapolis show HERE.

Now let’s check out a little bit of Bally Sagoo’s work.  Thanks to Richard over at Rough in Here for reminding me of Shree Sagoo’s remix of Reshmi Salwar Kurta Jaali Ka, that is titled Gori Gori Kudi, and performed by playback singer Shreya Ghosal in his movie Sajna Ve Sajna. The song was originally found in the 1957 film Naya Daur that you can’t help but love, and here it is reworked by Sagoo:

And here’s a bit more from Shree Sagoo:

Sorry for neglecting this blog, I got a bit sidetracked with work and with my new blog on swan towels, or should I say towel swans?

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Here I sit, wishing I were in L.A. attending this evening’s The Unforgettable Tour! But I’ve been told by posters to this site, jen (start a blog girl!) and theBollywoodFan, that they’ve taken me along to the show in spirit, so I feel good. I’m happily checking my blog statistics and spy that there are some incoming hits from AMITABH BACHCHAN’S blog

 

This may be the closest I ever get to Amitji, but I’ll take it! I know it doesn’t mean he actually read the comment, or even clicked through to this blog, but it’s a touch of something special anyway, a way for us all to somehow be a part of his world and to show our enthusiasm and appreciation for his work.  I did my research and I found on day 87, that monkey made the 508th comment.  Thanks for making my night world wide web, monkey, Amitabh Bachchan’s blog and my cyber dosto for bringing me to the show in spirit. Here’s monkey’s comment:

 

508. Monkey Says:
July 20th, 2008 at 7:25 pm

hey mr. B check out this blog website dedicated entirely to you and your tour.

https://bollywoodfoodclub.wordpress.com/2008/04/12/the-unforgettable-tour/#comment-1533

its for ur support and to keep u pumped. fans basically commnicating to one another.

Then I clicked over to Mr. Bachchan’s blog and fired off a post.  Imagine, my little comment made it to the same post!

716. sitaji Says:
July 27th, 2008 at 11:00 am

Dear Mr. Bachchan,
I wish I were attending your show tonight in LA. I wanted to alert you to the enthusiastic repsonses I’ve had over at my blog regarding your tour:

https://bollywoodfoodclub.wordpress.com/2008/04/12/the-unforgettable-tour/#comment-1628

The comments on this post I did regarding The Unforgettable Tour just keep coming. Welcome to America and all the best!
Sita-ji

What FUN!

Makes me wanna sing along with Lata, Asha, and Mahendra to Pyar Zindigi Hai!

Thanks for the video BollywoodArchive.

Please take note one of my favorite things in Bollywood in this video: Johnnie Walker being consumed.

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When I saw Nikkah (1982) which means an Islamic marriage contract, I thought it really should have been called Talaq, Talaq, Talaq! So in my post movie online research, I found that it originally was to be titled Talaq Talaq Talaq (divorce). I thought, “Hey that’s what I thought it should be titled too!”

Nikaah is a 1982 Hindi film produced and directed by B. R. Chopra. The film stars Raj Babbar, Deepak Parashar and Salma Agha in her Hindi movie debut role. The film also had Asrani, Iftekhar and Gufi Paintal in support roles. The films music is by Ravi. The original name of the movie was Talaq Talaq Talaq, but was renamed Nikaah on the insistence of Islamic clerics. (wikipedia)

No one wants to get on the wrong side of an Islamic cleric. The movie begins with a series of rather sensual oil painting in the background. Some of the paintings are nudes!

As the paintings flash by, a woman recites the following:

I am a woman the daughter of Eve
Sent down from the heavens pure and sacred
I’ve bloomed the flowers in this world
I give birth to a man and train him to walk
As a sister I tell him amusing stories
As his beloved, I make his life melodious
I sacrifice the precious pearls of my life
In a need I walk along with him
By serving him like this I lose my entity
The story of my sacrifice is in all the holy books
All that I have said is an illusion
I’ve always had one fear after many centuries
I may be pushed into some brothel
I don’t know when I may be bet in gambling
I may be compelled to prove my chastity
I may be put to death just after my death
I may be auctioned in the flesh markets
I may be accepted as a wife after marriage
I may also be divorced and rejected
My chastity may be ravaged by the same men
This is all because I am a woman

Off to a dramatic start with that opening poem, right? That’s followed by some subtitles I’d never seen before using the word buttock, not buttocks, just buttock:

That’s Haider Raj Babbar and his college buddies talking about Nilofer (Salma Agha). Haider is actually a good guy and is a real Ghazal expert. Haider and Nilo had a bit of an attraction in college, but Nilo was set to marry the fancy Nawab Wasim (Deepak Parashar) who immediately gets a business deal for a 5 star hotel! I love how often the term “5 star hotel” appears in Bollowood movies. I’ve seen enough Bollywood to know that the 5 star hotel theme is quite ominous and those involved in the deal will eventually fall from their greedy quest for power. 5 star hotel = bad guy. 5 star hotel = bad scene.

And sure enough, the 5 star hotel deal interrupts the celebration of the honeymoon. While Nawab Wasim meets with his business partners, poor Nilo sits on the rocky Mumbai beach, watching other honeymooners as she scrawls “honeymoon” on a rock, the word eventually being washed away by the crashing waves.

As may be predicted, since Nilo and Wasim’s marriage starts of with a rocky honeymoon (sorry couldn’t resist) it only continues to have highs and lows like the waves of the ocean. Eventually things take a nasty turn when Wasim gives Nilo a tight slap to the face, and the highs are gone. Nilo spends most of her time waiting for her workoholic husband, and when he finally appears after standing her up repeatedly, he’s often in a foul mood. Although Nilo dedicates herself to the marriage, she realizes that it’s not working.

But fear not ladies, Nilo is a strong woman and doesn’t take this abuse and the next time that arrogant nawab raises his hand to her she puts him in his place!

Macho Wasim has to have the last word. In fact he has the last 3 words and says “Talaq! Talaq! Talaq!” Giving her the triple talaq = D-I-V-O-R-C-E! I warn you if you see this scene and are prone to seizures, this may trigger one as it flashes back and forth between these 2 pictures at a rapid rate of about 100 times in 30 seconds.

 

Nilo gets her talaq and goes on to marry Haider, who thinks she may still love Wasim. Haider then trys to reunite Nilo and Wasim in an act of sacrifice. Nilo’s not having that! These men making all the decisions and not consulting with her at all drives her to the edge and she declares the truth:

What I loved about this movie:

  • More adabs and Subhan’allahs per scene than any movie ever!
  • 5 star hotels mentioned
  • Tight slaps to the face
  • Johnnie Walker consumed by a bad guy
  • Women triumph in the end

The most interesting part of this movie to me was the fact that Salma Agha was her own playback singer for the tune “Dil Ke Armaan” and won the Filmfare Best Female Playback Award for the song.

Thanks to anupkumar07 for the video.

LYRICS with and English translation by Madhu.

Even more interesting than Salma being her own playback singer is the fact that she was discovered at Rishi Kapoor & Neetu Singh’s wedding. And it gets even better: Salma was already famous for recording the hits of ABBA in Hindi with her sister Sabina:

AGHA – Salma and Sabina Agha sing ABBA hits in Hindi. (wikipedia)

Listen to Salma and Sabina work their magic:

Mamma Mia, Super Trooper, and Dancing Queen

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It’s been a Jewel Thief  week. 3 videos featuring 3 of the women stars have been featured earlier this week. 

I asked which of the women was the best match the jewel thief, Dev Anand: super spunky Anju (Tanuja), sensitive Shalu (Vyjayanthimala) or the vivascious Helen?  All through Jewel Thief  I kept wondering how Vyjayanthimala could be in a movie without dancing?

 

Then finally at the movie’s climax she delivered in this fantastic number “Hoton Pe Aisi Baat” with Lata Mangeshkar  as the playback singer. Once again the music is by S.D. Burman.  It’s because of this number that I officially choose Vyjayanthimala as my match for the jewel thief:

Thanks to crandallmcgee for the video

And for a little extra fun, since I love to see Johnnie Walker used in Bollywood movies, not to be confused with Johnny Walker, who I also like to see in Bollywood movies, I’ll include a few screen images from the movie featuring Johnnie Walker.

Food and whisky for days!

  

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Hare Rama Hare Krishna (1971) tackles lots of evils floating over from Montreal to Kathmandu: drugs, short skirts, hippies, smoking, drinking and the effects of divorce. I prefer the Hindi word for divorce: talak! Sounds so much more harsh and final than the word divorce. Say it: Talak! Doesn’t that sound more like divorce than divorce? Zeenat Aman‘s little Jasbir is told by her maid that her mom and brother are really dead, in order for her to better understand their disappearance from her life after the talak. How thoughtful of her. But I’m getting ahead of myself! What caused the divorce, I mean the talak? The philandering father (Kishore Sahu) is the cause and he flips the whole script on his wife (Achala Sachdev), blaming her. He asks for the divorce after downing some Johnnie Walker, then slaps his wife. In the first few minutes I had a scene combining a tight slap to the face AND drinking Johnnie Walker! Observe these serious parenting errors:

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So back to what I was saying about the maid. I loved how the maid broke the news to Jasbir that her mom and brother were dead, except for they weren’t really dead. I guess the maid thought it would be easier on the kid to explain their absence by telling her they were dead. See those ugly glasses on the nightstand?

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And if those images don’t show just how harsh things were for little Jasbir, take a look at what she has to tolerate from her new step mom in a pink negligee:

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Isn’t if easy for to understand why Jasbir wants to change her name to Janice and become a hippie after all the trouble she faced in Montreal?

When I watched Hare Rama Hare Krishna I just couldn’t stop focusing on Zeenat Aman‘s character’s glasses. Jasbir/Janice was such a mess as a kid. I know she needed those glasses to see, but did they have to be so ugly? I don’t blame her for not wanting to wear them both literally and metaphorically. The glasses were obviously used to symbolize her not wanting to have to “see” her disruptive home life, right?

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Skip ahead to her time in India and she sports groovy glasses, rose colored glasses. With that turbulent past Janice needs to see her world through rose colored glasses or not at all. It made me wondered if the saying rose colored glasses exists in Hindi. Zeenat Aman wearing those big round rose colored specs reminded me of my Malibu Barbie. Both the movie and the Malibu Barbie came out in 1971. Janice wore those pink glasses on top of her head a lot, just like Malibu Barbie did.

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Hare Rama Hare Krishna is a 1971 Indian film directed by Dev Anand starring himself and Zeenat Aman. The film was a hit and a star-making vehicle for Zeenat Aman, who played a westernized hippie, and won the Filmfare Best Supporting Actress Award, as well as the BFJA Award for Best Actress. The movie dealt with the decadence of the Hippie culture. It aimed to have an anti-drug message and also depicts some problems associated with Westernization such as divorce. The film is about a Montréal-based Indian family, the Jaiswals. The brother Prashant (Dev Anand) and sister Jasbir (Zeenat) have a good relationship as children. However, the parents quarrel and separate leaving Prashant with the mother and Jasbir with the father. Jasbir is repeatedly told that her mother and brother are dead and she eventually believes that she will never see Prashant again. She is ill-treated by her step mother and she runs away from home. Prashant grows up to be a pilot and he learns that Jasbir is in Kathmandu, Nepalwith a group of hippies. To reunite with his sister, Prashant travels to Kathmandu and meets Shanti (Mumtaz) who was to later marry him, and also Janice who in reality is his sister Jasbir with a new name and identity. She has forgotten her childhood and Prashant too. Prashant has to get his sister back amongst other events which include his being suspected as a thief in Kathmandu and fearing for his life. (wikipedia)

Philips Filum’s has an excellent synopsis of the movie, and Nandini already posted the most excellent song from the movie, Ho Re Ghungroo Ka Bole, featuring Mumtaz, who like Aman sported those fat yarn ribbons in her hair.

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Janice’s western ways and messed up childhood results in her drinking beer from a can:

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So finally, here’s the video of the day, “Asha Bhonsle won Filmfare Best Female Playback Award for the song Dum Maro Dum, which was a huge hit. The music of the film was composed by Rahul Dev Burman and the lyrics were written by Anand Bakshi.” (wikipedia)

Thanks to organicjerk for the video.

Since I love the talent shows, watch Shreya Ghoshal on Amul Star Voice of India’s Chhote Ustaad introduce Anwesha Dutta Gupta who covers the movie’s title track “Hare Rama Hare Krishna”

Video by dJabhik

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