Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Jayshree T.’

1970-g-sawan-bhadon2

As promised in yesterday’s post, I present you with more lovely images from Sawan Bhadon (1970).

Enjoy these images of the luminous and lusciouss Jayshree T. .

How could I narrow down the choices?  I couldn’t, so I’m posting them all.

Here is Jayshre T.’s  first performance in the film at the den of sin, as evidenced by the bottle of Johnnie Walker, red label.  At this point she is under the impression that she is being admired just for her dancing.


sawanbhadonjayshreetjohnniewalkerIt’s really not Bollywood for me until I see that bottle of Johnnie Walker and see someone slapped in the face.

sawanbhadonjayshreet5

sawanbhadonjayshreet4

sawanbhadonjayshreet9

sawanbhadonjayshreet6

sawanbhadonjayshreet8

To listen to the song  that go with these images, as well as all the music from the film, check this download at Music From The Third Floor.

 

Read Full Post »

Sawan Bhadon is a campy 1970 Bollywood film reviewed cleverly and thoroughly over a The Hot Spot Online and Planet Bollybob. With the film already being so well reviewed, I’m simply here to add some screen images to show some of the fun.

Within minutes of Sawan Badon starting, we see Jayshree T. as “Dolly” grooving around at a party, representing the evil influence of the West. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a video of this song to add, but a full listing of the film’s songs along with the album cover can be found over at Music From The Third Floor.

This dancing gets her noticed by an unsavory man who is ready to exploit her.

  

Sawan Bhadon is teenage Rekha’s debut film. She’s oh so sassy! Oh so spicy! Click HERE to see her picturized on playback singer Asha Bhosle’s Ik Dard Utha.

  

It was Planet BollyBob where I first read about The History of the Indian Movie Thermos.  Sawan Bhadon has one of the most thrilling thermos plots ever.

  

There’s also a wig that plays a pivotal part in the film:

Finally, Sawan Bhadon has the Bollywood staple of one actor (Navin Nischol or Naveen Nishal if you prefer) playing two roles in the same film. Is the Vinod or Vikram?

  

Tomorrow I will continue to avoid work, shopping, holiday preparation, and responsible living and upload to rest of the pictures I screen captured of Jayshree T. from this film. Namaste!

Read Full Post »

Dosto, I recently watched Namak Haaram (1973). Fabulous! Here are the basics:

Namak Haraam (Devanagari: नमक हराम, Nastaliq: نمک ہرام, is a 1973 Indian Hindi film directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee. The music is by R.D. Burman and the lyrics by Anand Bakshi. The film stars Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan. The film also stars Rekha, Asrani, Raza Murad, A.K. Hangal, Simi Garewal and Om Shivpuri . The film focused on two friends ( Rajesh and Amitabh) and how Rajesh tries to infiltrate the trade union of his friends. (wikipedia)

For a more coherent and substantial review of the film, check out rediff.com and Memsaab Story. I will of course deal with the superficial. I like to eat the frosting more than the cake, so first feast your eyes on this screen capture of our beloved Amitabh from the film which should be titled state of the art:

All starts out well with rich Vikram (Amit-ji) and super BFF, Somu (Rajesh Khanna) hanging around, wearing matching outfits, living the good life. They visit hot nautch girls and drink whiskey. Looking at Jayshree T. here it’s understandable why these guys would like to just hang out and be entertained.

But people in town talk, (haters!) and they are starting to call Somu Vikram’s spoon. Say What? I had never heard this phrase before, and I love when something like this comes up in a movie. I start to wonder is it: a.) a term I’ve just never heard of in English?; b.) Is this a British English term?; c.) Is this a Hindi figure of speech translated directly into English? Whatever it is I LOVE it. I ain’t nobody’s spoon! I take that being someone’s spoon means to be their flunkie, stooge, yes man, or dare I say, as used in the streets, their bitch? Anyway, the point seems to be that a spoon blindly follows someone who has more perceived power than the spoon does. Hindi speakers, please, I welcome your corrections to my interpretation of the term spoon if I’ve got it wrong. Somu’s sister tells him about what people are saying and he sets her straight!

Oh snap! Oh no he didn’t say that! So fast forward, Vicky has to go manage his father’s factory and his spoon, I mean Somu, tags along. They cook up a plan that Somu will infiltrate the factory, first posing as a worker and then eventually working his way up to, you’d never guess, a union organizer. Tricky! Somu eventually understands the struggle of the factory workers.

I adore seeing Johnnie Walker in these Bollywood films, and here it is, the extra fancy black label used to symbolize the good life, and its potential for arrogance. Somu tries to tell Vicky that it’s useful to try and call the low caste workers by their names:

Somu becomes so touched by the day to day struggles of the common worker that becomes a traitor, or as was written in the movie’s subtitles, namak haraam, to his friend Vicky, switching his loyalty from his friend to the workers. Namak haraam literally seems to translate to food/salt that’s not OK to eat, not sanctioned, not clean, not pure, not halaal, but figuratively the term means traitor. Once again, over some whiskey, Somu tries to make rich Vicky understand:

I know, I know, I already used this photo in yesterday’s post, but it’s so great I had to use it twice.  Can you blame me?

These socialists are such buzz kills! Eventually Vicky learns the wisdom of Somu’s ways. When Vicky finds out of Somu’s trouble, which you’ll have to watch the movie to find out about, he shows a delicious taste of angry Amitabh:

Namak Haraam is art imitating life as evidenced here. Doesn’t this sound a bit too familiar now:

Well since elections are coming soon here in the U S of A, here’s a timely song from the film titled Woh Jhoota Hai Vote Na Usko Dena, picturized on Asrani and a hot young Rekha, with music by R. D. Bruman. You can check it out HERE.

And speaking of voting…I’m so excited to present my first poll on the blog! So here I ask you the impossible question: Would you rather be a Namak Haraam or a spoon?

extra credit:

When looking up Namak Haraam online, I came across Arun Krishan’s clever podcast on his site, Cutting Chai, Learn Hindi from Bollywood Movies, since in it he credits a tune from the film in the music credits. You will certainly enjoy this, as well as all his other great podcasts:

Episode 47. Alcohol. Is alcoholism such a bad thing?

Read Full Post »