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Posts Tagged ‘Gulzar’

Ten_DVDDosto, yesterday I explained my foray into Iranian cinema.  Today I’ll  tell you about another Iranian film I saw, Ten (2002)  directed by the illustirous  Abbas Kiarostami.

Ten (Persian: ده) is a 2002 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami and starring Mania Akbari. It was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival and ranks at number 447 on Empire magazine’s 2008 list of the 500 greatest movies of all time. The film is divided into ten scenes, each of which depict a conversation between an unchanging female driver (played by Mania Akbari) and a variety of passengers as she drives around Tehran. Her passengers include her young son (played by Akbari’s real life son, Amin Maher), her sister, a bride, a prostitute, and a woman on her way to prayer. One of the major plots during the film is the driver’s divorce from her (barely seen) husband, and the conflict that this causes between mother and son. Much of the cast were untrained as actors, and the film has an improvisatory element. Elements of the characters were based on the actual life of the main actress and her son. The film was recorded on two digital cameras, one attached to each side of a moving car, showing the driver and passenger respectively. The film explores personal social problems arising in Iranian society, particularly the problems of women. (source)

You may be thinking Sita-ji, what does this have to do with Bollywood or the Indian film industry? Well just DEKH who he’s compared with here, some bahut famous Indian film makers!

Though Kiarostami has been compared to Satyajit Ray, Vittorio de Sica, Éric Rohmer, and Jacques Tati, his films exhibit a singular style, often employing techniques of his own invention. (source)

and

Kiarostami, along with Jean Cocteau, Derek Jarman, and Gulzar, is part of a tradition of filmmakers whose artistic expressions are not restricted to one medium, but who show the ability to use other forms such as poetry, set designs, painting, or photography to relate their interpretation of the world we live in and to illustrate their understanding of our preoccupations and identities. (source)

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Now if Kiarostami is mentioned in the same company as Satyajit Ray and Gulzar, I say that I’ll see more of his films!

I found a few more Bollywood similarities, firstly, the mention of orphans, so very Bollywood, na?

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There is also a lot of sound metaphysical advice given out, also typically Bollywood.  One of my favorite parts came when Mania Akbari’s character tried to comfort her friend who was just dumped with  practical and spiritual advice. I also liked how her friend cut her hair all off in order to move on from her loss.  Here are some of those images:

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I’m almost done posting on Iranian filums and will show you one more tomorrow.  As usual, I’d love to hear you’ve seen this film or any more of  Kiarostami’s works.  I know I’d like to see more of his films, though my dil is firmly in the land of Indian films now and forever.

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parichay

Parichay (1972) is inspired by The Sound of Music (1963), except for it’s splendidly Bharaticized.

Jeetendra is sent to teach Pran’s five grandchildren, the eldest of whom is played by Jaya Bhaduri. Their father Sanjeev Kumar, a talented musician, died after his wife’s death, so the children were sent to live with their paternal grandfather. The children have driven away their previous tutors and in turn, get corporal punishment by their aunt. After Jeetendra comes, the children play tricks on him too, but his gentle manner and patient methods win them over. He and Jaya Bhaduri fall in love, and the end credits indicate that there will be a wedding between them. (source)

I found this Parichay poster pictured below in Karen’s gallery. I wanted to include it to ask you if you’ve noticed in a lot of Jaya’s earlier work how she sticks the tip of her thumb and finger to her teeth and lips in an attempt to look coy and bashful. I don’t think that’s too cute, and once I noticed it, I kept noticing it. Look! If I ever meet Jaya, I’m going to do that myself while looking at her and see how she likes it.

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You get your Pran, Jeetendra, Jaya and cute kid fix with this film, but my favorite performer of all was Baby Pinky!

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Jeetendra’s character is called in to straighten up and teach Rai Saheb’s (Pran) unruly and orphaned grandchildren.

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I’ll go out on a limb and say the grandchildren may be acting up because their parents are DEAD and now that they live with grandpa, they’re treated like this:

parichay.pranand like this:

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Enter Ravi, who meets the cute kids:

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Look at the especially cute Sanjay (Master Raju) and Meeta (Baby Pinky):

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Now let me indulge you with more of Baby Pinky. Good thing this is an old movie and I’m in the USA, because I’m telling you, if I were anywhere near Baby Pinky during the time this film was made, I would have kidnapped her! Who would you kidnap from the film?

Please note in the photo below that Jaya is holding Pinky:

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She has to clamp Pinky down, because if she does not this is what happens:

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I can’t get enough of Baby Pinky:

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I know you’ll enjoy Sa Re Ke Sa Re with music by R. D. Burman, lyrics by Gulzar and playback singers Kishore Kumar & Asha Bhosle. Be sure to watch Baby Pinky’s super dance scene 2 minutes into this video.

Thanks to yuanyuanyuanyin for posting this video. Stop by her youtube channel for many Hindi treasures.

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Extra credit:

Watch the Do Re Mi clip from Sound of Music to compare it with Sa Re Ke Sa Re.

You can watch all of Parichay online HERE.

Now go  see  Memsaab’s Parichay review.

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I watched a parallel cinema film from 1993 last night directed by Kalpana Lazmi called Rudaali.  Like parallel cinema is supposed to do, it dealt with a serious topic: professional mourners, known as Rudaali in Hindi. I was happy to hear great music by both Lata and Asha throughout the movie, a feature not always present in the parallel cinema.  I had a whole stack of Hindi movies from the library waiting for me to watch them, and I was in the mood for some personal, professional mourning, as the night before a ferocious hail storm ruined my garden.  I knew I loved my hosta plants, but this destructive storm only confirmed this attachment.  What in the past I would have described as golf ball sized hail, and now refer to as ladoo sized hail, fell from the sky at high speeds and in minutes ruined my garden. These aren’t my hosta pictured here, I found the image online, (if you click on the picture you’ll see they belong to a math professor from the University of MN) but I believe mine would have looked like these if the storm taken a different path:

 

Ahh, the power of Shiva! I wanted to weep at the loss, and briefly hired myself as a professional mourner.  Afterwards, I had to accept it, tip my hat to mother nature’s shakti, and seek peace through a movie. I was in the mood to mourn and had the perfect movie in front of me so things were already looking up! Here’s a bit about the movie: 

Rudaali is a 1993 Hindi film directed by Kalpana Lajmi, based on the short story written by Mahasweta Devi. The title is a reference to a custom in certain areas of Rajasthan where women are hired as professional mourners after the death of a male relative. These women are referred to as a ‘rudaali’ (roo-dah-lee),literally translated as female weeper. Their purpose is to publicly express grief of family members that are not permitted to display emotion due to social status. The film is set in a small village in Rajasthan, India. It tells the story of a woman named Shanichari, who was abandoned by her mother shortly after her father’s death. Bad fortune follows as she marries an alcoholic, who leaves her with little hope of a brighter future for herself and her son. Throughout Shanichari’s lifetime of misfortune she has never cried. This creates great difficulty once she is called to become a rudaali until Bhinkni, an experienced mourner, enters her life. But Shanichari is simply led to more misery that will surely bring her to tears. Dimple Kapadia won a National Film Award for her role of Shanichari in the film. The film also features Raakhee, Raj Babbar and Amjad Khan in one of his last films. Amjad Khan had died before the film’s release and the film is dedicated to him at the beginning of the film’s credits. (wikipedia)

Read more on the film at Philip’sfil-ums, rAjOo, and alternate movies.

Here’s my progression of Amjad Khan viewing: Sholay (1975), Muqaddar Ka Sikander (1978), Qurbani (1980), Lawaaris (1981)  and last night I saw Rudaali (1993).  In the beginning Rudaali  you see this:

I then realized Amjad must have died around the time of the movie’s release.  I was thinking that maybe he wasn’t in the movie, but rather that the movie simply was dedicated to him. So when someone who looked like a MUCH BIGGER Amjad Khan appeared…

I couldn’t believe it was him. I remember seeing Khan in Lawaaris and thinking how chunky he’d become and how fitting since that character started out in the film as a pig of a man. Khan’s character appears in Rudaali several times and he’s on his death bed, trying unsuccessfully to die. Ironic that it was one of his last roles to play a dying man. 

 Finally I figured out that this was indeed Amjad Khan:

After I got over my shock about Amjad’s apperance, I was free to enjoy the film.

For today’s video, listen to Dil Hoom Hoom Gare” (My heart beats with fear) which is about Dimple’s character’s sad life, but reminds me of the hail storm I’d just survived.  I am dedicating to this song to my plants harmed by the storm.  It’s sung by Lata Mangeshkar, picturized on Dimple Kapadia, with lyrics by Gulzar, and music by Bhupen Hazarika:

Dil hoom hoom kare, ghabraaye

My heart is gasping, it shivers in fear

Ghan dham dham kare, darr jaaye

The clouds are thundering, my heart becomes afraid

Ek boond kabhi paani ki mori ankhiyon se barsaaye

A drop of water sometimes flows from my eyes

Dil hoom hoom kare, ghabraaye

My heart is gasping, it shivers in fear

More Lyrics HERE.

Thanks to Dimple, for her excellent acting, for crying over my injured hosta, for being the Rudaali of my hail storm.

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Omkara (Hindi: ओमकारा, Urdu: امکارا) is a 2006 Hindi film adaptation of Shakespeare’s Othello directed by Vishal Bharadwaj. It starred Ajay Devgan, Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor in lead roles, supported by Vivek Oberoi, Naseeruddin Shah and Konkona Sen Sharma with a ‘’special appearance’’ from Bipasha Basu. The director Vishal Bharadwaj himself composed the entire music for the film, including the background score, with song lyrics by Gulzar.  (wikepedia) 

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Saw this film for the second time tonight, and thought this song is as lovely as Saif Ali Khan  is bad ass in the movie.“O Saathi Re” with playback singers  Shreya Ghoshal & Vishal Bharadwaj, composed by Vishal Bharadwaj .

Video courtesy of  NurseM4U 

LYRICS

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Shahrukh Khan, Manisha Koirala, and Preity Zinta star in Dil Se, worth watching if only for its fantastic song Chaiyya Chaiyya,” by A. R. Rahman, lyrics by Gulzar! I remember reading somewhere that this was filmed without the use of safety harnesses, which makes it all the more impressive if it’s true. Once again, a Bollywood film without a train scene?  Never!

Chaiyya Chaiyya“not only reached the charts in India, but also became popular in England. The song is sung by Sukhwinder Singh and Sapna Awasthi, with lyrics by Gulzar. It is featured in the opening of the second act of the musical Bombay Dreams. Remixes of the song were used in the opening and closing credits of the 2006 film, Inside Man, directed by Spike Lee and produced by Brian Grazer. The opening credits have the original version by A.R. Rahman with additional trumpet accompaniment and the closing credits feature a hip-hop-inflected remix featuring Punjabi MC (Chaiyya Chaiyya Bollywood Joint). The song was also featured in the pilot episode of the television show Smith. A cover of this song was performed in episode 5 of season 5 of CSI: Miami. The video was filmed on top of the Ooty train in mountainous southern India while actor Shah Rukh Khan dances with Malaika Arora and other dancers. Along with the thrill of dancing atop a moving train, the scenery around the train is equally stunning and beautiful. This music video also started a popular dance called the “Bombay Clap”. The cinematography of the film was handled by Santosh Sivan. The choreography by Farah Khan is considered among the most difficult ever done; a few dancers sustained minor injuries. The film was shot in Kashmir, Assam, Delhi and other parts of India and Bhutan over a period of 55 days. Its cinematography won a National Film Award for cinematographer Santosh Sivan. The film’s score and soundtrack were composed by A. R. Rahman. A. R. Rahman received a Filmfare Award for the music. The film became the first Indian film to reach the Top 10 in the UK Box Office Charts, when released in 1998. (wikipedia)

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Bunty Aur Babli (2005) bab.jpgstars  Amitabh Bachchan, Abhishek Bachchan and Rani Mukerji. Watch Aishwarya Rai ‘s special performance from the movie in Kajra Re with playback singers Alisha Chinai, Shankar Mahadevan, and Javed Ali, and lyrics by Gulzar.

Thanks to luvinlyf for the youtube video.

Thanks to BollyWhat? for LYRICS in Hindi and English.

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Today’s video has the following in commom from yesterday’s video: A. R. Rahman‘s music and Aishwarya Rai ‘s dancing.

From  guru2.jpgGuru, (2007) “Tere Bina”, another beautiful song from A. R. Rahman,  with lyrics by Gulzar, and I admit it brought tears to my eyes the first time I heard it, and still can. A. R. Rahman &  Gulzar, sure can manipulate the tears from my eyes, damn them! I wonder if I actually understood more than a few words in Hindi if the song would have more or less influence? I also love the dialogue at the end of the scene:

Sujata (Aishwarya Rai ) : “Fight with the whole world, but not with me.” 

Guru (Abhishek Bachchan: If you’re with me, I can beat the whole world.”

So I challenge you to watch and NOT cry, can you? Well maybe men can, but ladies?

Lyrics

It was also fun to see Mithun Chakraborty in the movie as the journalist, a bit of a departure from his character in Dance Dance and Disco Dancer .

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