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Posts Tagged ‘Dev Anand’

It’s been a Jewel Thief  week. 3 videos featuring 3 of the women stars have been featured earlier this week. 

I asked which of the women was the best match the jewel thief, Dev Anand: super spunky Anju (Tanuja), sensitive Shalu (Vyjayanthimala) or the vivascious Helen?  All through Jewel Thief  I kept wondering how Vyjayanthimala could be in a movie without dancing?

 

Then finally at the movie’s climax she delivered in this fantastic number “Hoton Pe Aisi Baat” with Lata Mangeshkar  as the playback singer. Once again the music is by S.D. Burman.  It’s because of this number that I officially choose Vyjayanthimala as my match for the jewel thief:

Thanks to crandallmcgee for the video

And for a little extra fun, since I love to see Johnnie Walker used in Bollywood movies, not to be confused with Johnny Walker, who I also like to see in Bollywood movies, I’ll include a few screen images from the movie featuring Johnnie Walker.

Food and whisky for days!

  

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If the last 2 numbers featured from Jewel Thief (1967) I posted here don’t make you want to see the movie, this one will. Two days back there was the heartfelt Rula Ke gaya Sapna Mera,” then there was the upbeat Raat Akeli Hai.” I posed the question about who you think Dev Anand, the jewel thief, should choose: super spunky Anju (Tanuja) or sensitive Shalu (Vyjayanthimala)? Well now there’s another lady in the film to consider:

Helen, queen of the nautch girls!

Once again here’s playback singer extrodinaire, Asha Bhosle, and music by S.D. Burman with the madcapped, over the top,“Baithe Hain Kya Usike Paas.”

Warning: this video is hot!

Thanks to crandallmcgee for the video.

 

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Yesterday’s video was also from Jewel Thief (1967). Today I was inspired by Shweta who commented about yesterday’s sad scene featuring a tearful Vyjayanthimala:

Vayjanti bores me to tears (by her tears) in this one-Dev actually had the option of going out with Tanuja in the movie, who is far more cheerful and peppy- and he chose the former! it boggles the mind.”

Take a look at Tanuja‘s attempt to seduce Dev Anand here in “Raat Akeli Hai” with playback singer extrodinaire, Asha Bhosle, music by S.D. Burman. Yes, Anju (Tanuja) is certainly more spunky and enthusiastic than the sensitive and weepy Shalu (Vyjayanthimala), but more importantly, Anju has a super cool house! Who do you think is a better choice for the jewel thief, Anju or Shalu?

Video thanks to subhashanurag

Since I love the talent shows of India, here’s SVOI Chote Ustad’s 2008 winner Aishwarya Mujmudar’s version of “Raat Akeli Hai,” the sound quality is poor, but she does a fantastic job. Plus, you get to see Alka-ji give the young girl a necklace and many tears of gratitude flow.  I love Alka!

Video thanks to looking4u84

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It’s possible for me to love the costumes, characters, sets, and music of a film, without actually loving the film. That’s what happened to me with Jewel Thief (1967). What a such a stylish movie! It’s nonstop eye candy. Philip’sFil-ums has a compact, but power packed synopsis of the film here.

Jewel Thief is a 1967 Indian Hindi film. The film is a crime thriller, and stars Dev Anand, Vyjayantimala, Ashok Kumar, Tanuja, Anju Mahendru, Sachin and Helen. Vinay, an ordinary young man who finds himself constantly mistaken for a look-alike jewel thief named Amar. Vinay works with the police to impersonate Amar and crack his crime ring–but it seems that Amar has decided to impersonate Vinay, as well, and soon their true identities are thoroughly muddled. (wikipedia)

Here Shalu is perplexed about who she thinks is her fiance ignoring her. Is he Vinay or Amar? Watch the scene HERE.

This confusion drives poor Shalu to this:

Ah, Shalu, we’ve all been there! It’s always darkest before the dawn. To the rescue comes Dev’s character to deliver the wisdom of Bollywood:

I don’t mean to bring you down with such a sad song, but hey it’s Sunday, the time to reflect on life, get a bit melancholy about going back to work tomorrow, so this is really a perfect song for that mood: “Rula Ke Gaya Sapna Mera” by playback singer Lata Mangeshkar, picturised on Vyjayanthimala with Dev Anand lurking in the background. The music is by S.D. Burman.

video thanks to 19Awara51

Lyrics

Remember dosto, like Vinay/Amar says,

“night is passing by, and soon it will be morning.”

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Hare Rama Hare Krishna (1971) tackles lots of evils floating over from Montreal to Kathmandu: drugs, short skirts, hippies, smoking, drinking and the effects of divorce. I prefer the Hindi word for divorce: talak! Sounds so much more harsh and final than the word divorce. Say it: Talak! Doesn’t that sound more like divorce than divorce? Zeenat Aman‘s little Jasbir is told by her maid that her mom and brother are really dead, in order for her to better understand their disappearance from her life after the talak. How thoughtful of her. But I’m getting ahead of myself! What caused the divorce, I mean the talak? The philandering father (Kishore Sahu) is the cause and he flips the whole script on his wife (Achala Sachdev), blaming her. He asks for the divorce after downing some Johnnie Walker, then slaps his wife. In the first few minutes I had a scene combining a tight slap to the face AND drinking Johnnie Walker! Observe these serious parenting errors:

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So back to what I was saying about the maid. I loved how the maid broke the news to Jasbir that her mom and brother were dead, except for they weren’t really dead. I guess the maid thought it would be easier on the kid to explain their absence by telling her they were dead. See those ugly glasses on the nightstand?

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And if those images don’t show just how harsh things were for little Jasbir, take a look at what she has to tolerate from her new step mom in a pink negligee:

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Isn’t if easy for to understand why Jasbir wants to change her name to Janice and become a hippie after all the trouble she faced in Montreal?

When I watched Hare Rama Hare Krishna I just couldn’t stop focusing on Zeenat Aman‘s character’s glasses. Jasbir/Janice was such a mess as a kid. I know she needed those glasses to see, but did they have to be so ugly? I don’t blame her for not wanting to wear them both literally and metaphorically. The glasses were obviously used to symbolize her not wanting to have to “see” her disruptive home life, right?

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Skip ahead to her time in India and she sports groovy glasses, rose colored glasses. With that turbulent past Janice needs to see her world through rose colored glasses or not at all. It made me wondered if the saying rose colored glasses exists in Hindi. Zeenat Aman wearing those big round rose colored specs reminded me of my Malibu Barbie. Both the movie and the Malibu Barbie came out in 1971. Janice wore those pink glasses on top of her head a lot, just like Malibu Barbie did.

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Hare Rama Hare Krishna is a 1971 Indian film directed by Dev Anand starring himself and Zeenat Aman. The film was a hit and a star-making vehicle for Zeenat Aman, who played a westernized hippie, and won the Filmfare Best Supporting Actress Award, as well as the BFJA Award for Best Actress. The movie dealt with the decadence of the Hippie culture. It aimed to have an anti-drug message and also depicts some problems associated with Westernization such as divorce. The film is about a Montréal-based Indian family, the Jaiswals. The brother Prashant (Dev Anand) and sister Jasbir (Zeenat) have a good relationship as children. However, the parents quarrel and separate leaving Prashant with the mother and Jasbir with the father. Jasbir is repeatedly told that her mother and brother are dead and she eventually believes that she will never see Prashant again. She is ill-treated by her step mother and she runs away from home. Prashant grows up to be a pilot and he learns that Jasbir is in Kathmandu, Nepalwith a group of hippies. To reunite with his sister, Prashant travels to Kathmandu and meets Shanti (Mumtaz) who was to later marry him, and also Janice who in reality is his sister Jasbir with a new name and identity. She has forgotten her childhood and Prashant too. Prashant has to get his sister back amongst other events which include his being suspected as a thief in Kathmandu and fearing for his life. (wikipedia)

Philips Filum’s has an excellent synopsis of the movie, and Nandini already posted the most excellent song from the movie, Ho Re Ghungroo Ka Bole, featuring Mumtaz, who like Aman sported those fat yarn ribbons in her hair.

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Janice’s western ways and messed up childhood results in her drinking beer from a can:

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So finally, here’s the video of the day, “Asha Bhonsle won Filmfare Best Female Playback Award for the song Dum Maro Dum, which was a huge hit. The music of the film was composed by Rahul Dev Burman and the lyrics were written by Anand Bakshi.” (wikipedia)

Thanks to organicjerk for the video.

Since I love the talent shows, watch Shreya Ghoshal on Amul Star Voice of India’s Chhote Ustaad introduce Anwesha Dutta Gupta who covers the movie’s title track “Hare Rama Hare Krishna”

Video by dJabhik

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Hey, It’s Ash Wednesday. So this means I think of this Aish too!

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One of the things I love best about Bollywood films are the spiritual and moral messages woven in with the music, dancing, action and melodrama.  Don’t you? I also adore all that suffering! Of course as a Catholic I know that suffering leads to purification, hain na? And Ash Wednesday officially kicks off Lent and those 40 days of sacrifice and suffering. So with this special day in mind, let’s enjoy a little sorrow and suffering dosto!

Bollywood teaches so many lessons, like this one, from the 1965 movie Guide. Click over to  DocBollywood for some interesting information on Guide. Here Dev Anand tells Waheeda Rehman some very valuable information:

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Guide also teaches us about sorrow and suffering:

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Remember that thou art dust and unto dust thou shalt return. -God or Ram

Happy Ash Wednesday!

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