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Posts Tagged ‘Amjad Khan’

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The word association I have with leprosy is Mother Teresa, India, and Jesus. After reading this,

Many doctors view leprosy as a scourge of Biblical times or faraway places, but there are still thousands of U.S. cases, with more diagnosed each year, experts say (source)

maybe I’ll associate leprosy with the U.S. now too. This map shows that I wasn’t too wrong to associate leprosy with India. The WHO has all the latest leprosy statistics HERE.

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deshpremeeinquilabjesus2With all the Bollywood movies I’ve seen, you’d think I would have run across a leper sooner than now, but it took Desh Premee (1982) to expose me to my first Bollywood leper, Shamila Tagore, as Bharati. Finally! And speaking of me associating Jesus and lepers, Amitabh breaks out with the most Jesus looking parts in this film. Just look at him suffering here. —————>

If that doesn’t remind you of Jesus and his crown of thorns, I don’t know what will. I know with Christmas right around the corner it’s baby Jesus time of year and not crown of thorns Jesus time, but still, I’m technically working in a Christmas theme.

Since it’s a Manmohan Desai film, I’ll save my self a lot of explaining and refer you to this SYNOPSIS. An extra bonus to the film is Shammi Kapoor playing a lovable, chunky Sikh. You can see a bit of Sikh Shammi in this number.

More and more I’m loving Kader Khan as a villian. Have you seen him in Tawaif? In Desh Premee Khan plays Sher Singh who snatchs Bharati from her freedom fighter, patriot husband (Amitabh) as part of a revenge plot. Sher Singh lusts after Bharati for years, yet she remains faithful to her husband who believes her to be dead. Bharti is repulsed by the scoundrel and tells him:

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Careful what you wish for Bharati! Evil Sher Singh puts Bharati up in a filthy rat infested hovel and she comes down with leprosy. I don’t think leprosy is passed by rats, but you get the point watching the scene in her new home when a rat crawls out of a hole in a wall: Rat = dirty = bad = leprosy. As a means to depict how depraved Sher Singh is, he’s shown frolicking with trashy goris. Look! One gori is drinking, the other is smoking, while one clutches his leg. Dirty! Bad!

When I see them, I lose track of the film and am instantly plopped into reality and think stuff like, “Are these German toursists? They look German. How did they get these parts? I wonder why they were traveling in India? Are they friends?” OK, back to the film. After years Bharti returns, in the midst of Sher Singh’s debauchery. He thought she’d never come around to his advances and that this is finally his lucky day!

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Then she says what he’s dreamed of hearing her say…

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HA! Tricked! Take THAT Sher Singh!

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deshpremeeshirt1Have you seen leprosy in any Bollywood movies? I would also like to include the image of another one of the bad guys from the film, just because I wanted to show the world his shirt and scarf.

OK, to end on a happy note, forget about the leprosy and check out Hema Malini and Amitabh in blackface performing Gori Nahin Hum Kaali Sahi, with music by Laxmikant-Pyarelal. The playback singers are Asha Bhosle and the song’s writer, Laxmikant. This video either needs no introduction or a really big one, I can’t tell.

If you click on the video and it says embedding disabled, just click it again to get there.

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I watched a parallel cinema film from 1993 last night directed by Kalpana Lazmi called Rudaali.  Like parallel cinema is supposed to do, it dealt with a serious topic: professional mourners, known as Rudaali in Hindi. I was happy to hear great music by both Lata and Asha throughout the movie, a feature not always present in the parallel cinema.  I had a whole stack of Hindi movies from the library waiting for me to watch them, and I was in the mood for some personal, professional mourning, as the night before a ferocious hail storm ruined my garden.  I knew I loved my hosta plants, but this destructive storm only confirmed this attachment.  What in the past I would have described as golf ball sized hail, and now refer to as ladoo sized hail, fell from the sky at high speeds and in minutes ruined my garden. These aren’t my hosta pictured here, I found the image online, (if you click on the picture you’ll see they belong to a math professor from the University of MN) but I believe mine would have looked like these if the storm taken a different path:

 

Ahh, the power of Shiva! I wanted to weep at the loss, and briefly hired myself as a professional mourner.  Afterwards, I had to accept it, tip my hat to mother nature’s shakti, and seek peace through a movie. I was in the mood to mourn and had the perfect movie in front of me so things were already looking up! Here’s a bit about the movie: 

Rudaali is a 1993 Hindi film directed by Kalpana Lajmi, based on the short story written by Mahasweta Devi. The title is a reference to a custom in certain areas of Rajasthan where women are hired as professional mourners after the death of a male relative. These women are referred to as a ‘rudaali’ (roo-dah-lee),literally translated as female weeper. Their purpose is to publicly express grief of family members that are not permitted to display emotion due to social status. The film is set in a small village in Rajasthan, India. It tells the story of a woman named Shanichari, who was abandoned by her mother shortly after her father’s death. Bad fortune follows as she marries an alcoholic, who leaves her with little hope of a brighter future for herself and her son. Throughout Shanichari’s lifetime of misfortune she has never cried. This creates great difficulty once she is called to become a rudaali until Bhinkni, an experienced mourner, enters her life. But Shanichari is simply led to more misery that will surely bring her to tears. Dimple Kapadia won a National Film Award for her role of Shanichari in the film. The film also features Raakhee, Raj Babbar and Amjad Khan in one of his last films. Amjad Khan had died before the film’s release and the film is dedicated to him at the beginning of the film’s credits. (wikipedia)

Read more on the film at Philip’sfil-ums, rAjOo, and alternate movies.

Here’s my progression of Amjad Khan viewing: Sholay (1975), Muqaddar Ka Sikander (1978), Qurbani (1980), Lawaaris (1981)  and last night I saw Rudaali (1993).  In the beginning Rudaali  you see this:

I then realized Amjad must have died around the time of the movie’s release.  I was thinking that maybe he wasn’t in the movie, but rather that the movie simply was dedicated to him. So when someone who looked like a MUCH BIGGER Amjad Khan appeared…

I couldn’t believe it was him. I remember seeing Khan in Lawaaris and thinking how chunky he’d become and how fitting since that character started out in the film as a pig of a man. Khan’s character appears in Rudaali several times and he’s on his death bed, trying unsuccessfully to die. Ironic that it was one of his last roles to play a dying man. 

 Finally I figured out that this was indeed Amjad Khan:

After I got over my shock about Amjad’s apperance, I was free to enjoy the film.

For today’s video, listen to Dil Hoom Hoom Gare” (My heart beats with fear) which is about Dimple’s character’s sad life, but reminds me of the hail storm I’d just survived.  I am dedicating to this song to my plants harmed by the storm.  It’s sung by Lata Mangeshkar, picturized on Dimple Kapadia, with lyrics by Gulzar, and music by Bhupen Hazarika:

Dil hoom hoom kare, ghabraaye

My heart is gasping, it shivers in fear

Ghan dham dham kare, darr jaaye

The clouds are thundering, my heart becomes afraid

Ek boond kabhi paani ki mori ankhiyon se barsaaye

A drop of water sometimes flows from my eyes

Dil hoom hoom kare, ghabraaye

My heart is gasping, it shivers in fear

More Lyrics HERE.

Thanks to Dimple, for her excellent acting, for crying over my injured hosta, for being the Rudaali of my hail storm.

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Today’s video is the song,“Pardesi Pardesi” from Raja Hindustani (1996). First off here’s a bit about the movie:

raja.jpgRaja Hindustani (1996). (Hindi: राजा हिंदुस्तानी, Urdu: راجا ہندوستانی) is a 1996 Bollywood film directed by Dharmesh Darshan. It is a tale of cab driver from a small town who falls in love with a rich girl. Aamir Khan and Karisma Kapoor play the lead roles. The film became a box office hit. Its theme is similar to the 1960s hit Jab Jab Phool Khile starring Nanda and Shashi Kapoor. Two people from opposite socio-economic backgrounds fall in love and get married against the girl’s family’s wishes. The girl’s family then conspires to create a rift between the couple by exploiting the boy’s jealous, short-tempered nature. Wealthy Mr Sehgal (Suresh Oberoi) lives with his daughter, Aarti (Karisma Kapoor), and her stepmother Shalini (Archana Puran Singh) in a palatial home. Aarti wants to go for a vacation to a small hill station named Palankhet where her parents had met for the first time. Once there, she meets with taxi-driver Raja Hindustani (Aamir Khan), and after a short period of time, both fall in love with each other, and get married without Mr. Sehgal’s blessings. Eventually, Mr Sehgal forgives his daughter, and invites both newlyweds to his palatial home, not knowing that his wife, her brother, Swaraj (Pramod Moutho), and her nephew Jai (Mohnish Behl) have plans for him and his daughter that will change their lives forever. (wikipedia)

The movie stars Aamir Khan, Karisma Kapoor, Suresh Oberoi, Johnny Lever, Nevneet Nishan, Veeru Krishnan, Archana Puran Singh, Pramod Muthu, and the young Kunal Khemu. Kalpana Iyer and Pratibha Sinha are the roadside dancers in this clip of “Pardesi Pardesi.” The drunken-sharabi one, Kalpana Iyer, shows up in my internet research as the paramour of the married Amjad Khan! Her wikipedia link says, “Kalpana has been rumoured to have a live-in relationship with Bollywood villain, Amjad Khan until his death in 1992.”

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Well she is pretty hot and scary at the same time.

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I bet after seeing these screen images you can understand why I can’t get “Pardesi Pardesi” or the movie out of my head. The playback singers of the version here are Udit Narayan , Sapna Awasthi, and Alka Yagnik. There’s also a version of Pardesi Pardesiwith Kumar Sanu and Alka Yagnik as the playback singers. Enjoy and beware, this song may temporarily take over your brain!

“Foreigner, foreigner, don’t go and leave me. Foreigner, my friend, keep your promise! Remember me, don’t forget somehow!”

Thanks for the YouTube video chandaliali

LYRICS in Hindi and English and synopsis thanks to BollyWhat?

For more stills and a review about this great film click HERE.

For a bit of chugli on Karisma, read this blog entry: “The Real Pardesi

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Veteran Bollywood filmmaker G.P. Sippy dies at age 93.

Here’s a video about his life and his passing.

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G.P. Sippy cremated Mumbai (PTI): Veteran Bollywood producer-director G P Sippy, who had become a household name with his 1975 blockbuster “Sholay”, was cremated here on wednesday. Sippy, who died on Tuesday night, was cremated at 11.45 am at the electric crematorium in Chandanwadi, Marine Lines. His family members and close relatives were present for the funeral. 93-year-old Sippy was suffering from age-related ailments for past few months. A scion of a rich Sindhi family, Sippy’s career got to a flying start with the film “Marine Drive” (1955) and went on to produce “Adl-e-e-Jahangir” with Pradeep Kumar, Meena Kumari and Durga Khote as its star cast, in the same year. The 50s and 60s was a hectic time for Sippy, with his banner producing and directing flicks like “Shrimati 420,” “Chandrakant,” “Light House,” “Bhai Behan” and “Andaaz”. In 1972, Sippy, along with son Ramesh, made super hit “Seeta aur Geeta” with Hema Malini in a double role. However, the movie for which he will be always remembered is “Sholay” which boasted of an impressive star cast that included Sanjeev Kumar, Amitabh Bachchan, Jaya Bachchan, Hema Malini and Dharmendra. Later on, he also produced films like “Saagar” (1985), “Raju Ban Gaya Gentleman” (1992), “Aatish” (1992), “Zamaana Deewana” (1995) which were also well-received by the audience. Sippy was the chairman of the Film and TV Producers Guild of India on four occasions in the 70s, 80s and 90s. He also bagged the Filmfare awards in 1968 and 1982. (The Hindu)

To honor G.P. Sippy‘s life, our video today is from his massive hit movie, Sholay, starring Dharmendra, Amitabh Bachchan, Hema Malini, Sanjeev Kumar, Jaya Bhaduri and Amjad Khan. The song is “Yeh Dosti” by R. D. Burman, sung by Kishore Kumar and Manna Dey.

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Watch the good dosto, Amitabh and Dharmendra here:

Thanks to elitesurfer for the YouTube video.

LYRICS in Hindi with English translation

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It’s day 3 of “O Saathi Re”!

sikandar.jpgLook at the young Amitabh trying to attend the party of his high caste friend. Isn’t that the same boy who played kid-Amitabh in Lawaaris? It is! Look at him now!

Both songs come from the 1978 movie Muqaddar Ka Sikander, starring Amitabh Bachchan, Vinod Khanna, Raakhee Gulzar, Rekha and Amjad Khan.

As luck would have it, I came across another blogger smitten with this great movie.

Check out “the post punk cinema club” review of Muqaddar Ka Sikander .

 

 

Thanks to youtuber balleballe48 for the video.

LYRICS in Hindi and English courtesy of BollyWhat?

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sikandar10.jpgYesterday’s video from Omkara was the song “O Saathi Re” and here’s a different “O Saathi Re” song, this time Kishore Kumar is the playback singer, and Amitabh Bachchan is pretending to sing. Amitabh’s speech before the song is so touching, even though I don’t understand too much of it, he still makes the point. This clip is from the 1978 movie Muqaddar Ka Sikander, starring Amitabh Bachchan, Vinod Khanna, Raakhee Gulzar, Rekha and Amjad Khan. We’ve already posted another great song from the movie on this blog, “Salaam-e-ishq Meri Jaan” , also written by Kalyanji Anandji, so check that out too.

Thanks to youtuber rajnishnagar for the video.

LYRICS

And here’s another set of the lyrics translated by theBollywoodFan.

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Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving with today’s video starring Helen dancing to “Mehbooba Mehbooba,” sung by R. D. Burman from Sholay. Here are the LYRICS.

180px-y_gabbar_thakur.jpgSholay (Hindi: शोले, Urdu: شعلے) (advertised in English as fire is the biggest blockbuster in the history of Bollywood, India’s Hindi film industry. It was released in 1975 and starred Dharmendra, Amitabh Bachchan, Hema Malini, Sanjeev Kumar, Jaya Bhaduri and Amjad Khan as the timeless villain, Gabbar Singh. It is the highest grossing film of all time in India. It has earned Rs. 2,36,45,00,000 equivalent to US$ 60 million, after adjusting for inflation. In 1999, BBC India declared it the “Film of the Millennium”; in 2005, the judges of the 50th annual Filmfare awards awarded it with a special award called Filmfare Best Film of 50 YearsIndiatimes Movies ranks the movie amongst the Top 25 Must See Bollywood Films. When first released the film was declared a commercial disaster. Word of mouth convinced movie-goers to give the film a chance and soon it became a box-office phenomenon. It ran for 286 weeks straight (more than five years) in one Mumbai theatre, the Minerva. Sholay racked up a still record 60 golden jubilees across India, and doubled its original gross over reruns during the late 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. Sholay was the first film in the history of Indian cinema to celebrate silver jubilee (25 weeks) at over a hundred theatres across India. To date, more than 1,100 prints of Sholay are in circulation-the highest number for any Hindi film. (wikipedia)

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