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Archive for the ‘Malayalam’ Category

Dosto, with the help of my seasoned VCR, I traveled down south to the tip of mother India to watch a Malayalam film titled Chocolate (2007).  I love the description here, which must have come from some review:roma_prithvi_nep

Chocolateis a Malayalam movie released in 2007, directed by Shafi. This is a campus story entertainer. Main actors are Prithviraj, Jayasurya, Roma, Samvrutha Sunil, and Remya Nabeeshan. Music by Alex Paul and lyrics by Vayalar Sarath Chandra Varma and Singers are M.G. Sreekumar and Rimi Tomy. With Prithviraj playing the Casanova, director Shafi’s new offering Chocolate — with its sweet smelling aroma is indeed delicious. Easy on the eyes, soft on the ears, this pure comedy entertainer, which centers on a gallivanting gadabout, being the lone male in an all women’s college, is chock-a-block with hilarity as Prithiviraj plays protagonist Shyam to the hilt. Playing perfect foil to him are Roma, Samvritha Sunil and Remya Nabeeshan as Ann, Nandana and Susanna – the trio who are against a male entering into their kingdom. Debutants Sachi and Sethu’s screenplay sparkles with laugh-a-minute scenes. (source)

You get the idea now of the whimsical plot: lone male student at an all women’s college. Wacky! Also HOT!  Now I know some people assume that south Indian films are a tad bit violent and perhaps misogynistic. I think that’s a stereotype about Mollywood, right?

cholate.well

cholate.beat Damn!

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Also, of course all the men had moustaches since this was a Southie film.  Now that I think of it, I don’t recall ever seeing a man without the moustache in the film. Now to the subtitle fun.  There were quite a few times that I saw some great nonsensical subtitles.  Here are a few from one on the dance numbers:

cholate.chocolatesong

cholate.chocolatesong2

Other times I saw subtitles that on the surface made no sense, but for some reason, I really understood what they were trying to say, since I now understand that I lived in Kochi in a previous life.  Like these…perfectly sensible to me:

cholate.laugh cholate.roma.wavelength

As in many movies, in Chocolate there are a lot of misunderstanding stacked upon misunderstanding which drive the plot.

cholate.paper

Now take a look at this series regarding the “improper behavior”  news that even made the paper and I will translate the translations:

cholate.telephonic

The message above means that since there was only information given over the phone, it can’t be confirmed as reliable…

cholate.fresh

Yes, this means even in India there are haters, just jealous of carefree youth and their masti.

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This means so what if a young man and women were in a room together unchaperoned for a short time, it doesn’t mean they had relations of a sexual nature.  If this was true, Prithviraj’s character is trying to say that it would follow that 2 men in a room together unchaperoned would then be guilty of homosexuality.

I really liked Roma Asrani and Prithviraj, first time seeing them both and they were adorable.  OK, Prithviraj was HOT, but I don’t feel right saying that since he’s so my junior, hai na?  The supporting costars Samvrutha Sunil and Jayasurya also did a nice job and I’d like to see more of their work.  Well let’s see all four actors in a song from the film, shall we? This isn’t a flashy song, but I did like the simple dancing, since I think I could easily join them if I were an understudy suddenly called to action. “Where’s that gori?  Roma broke her ankle! Find the gori extra, stat! We need her to fill in for the item number now!” I also thought that Briyanshu would enjoy the first 20 seconds of this scene and the song  Ishtamalle Ishtamalle:

Lyrics in Malayalam, but I don’t know what they mean.

Ultimately the film has a happy ending:  the hero carrying off his love interest, in caveman style:cholate.end

and uplifting message of equality:

cholate.trust

Plus, I love seeing the word enemity used in subtitles:

cholate.enemity

If you’re interested in watching the movie,  it has been uploaded at Daily Motion in several segments with English subtitles HERE.

Now, I wonder why the movie was titled Chocolate, and also wonder what the term “chocolate boy” means in India?  I’ve both heard and read “chocolate boy” and don’t know what it means.  Chocolate boy matlab? Is it like a metrosexual? Could that have something to then do with the film’s title?

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Kandukondain Kandukondain (Tamil: கண்டுகொண்டேன் கண்டுகொண்டேன்) is a 2000 Tamil film directed by Rajiv Menon. The film was also dubbed into Telugu as Priyuraalu Pilichindi. The film is a contemporary Indian take on Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility. Starring Mammootty as Bala, Aishwarya Rai as Meenakshi, Tabu as Sowmya, Ajith as Manohar, and Abbas as Srikanth.

Set in modern India, it’s a classical tale of a widowed mother and her three daughters: Saumya and Meenakshi who are grown-up and beautiful, and Kamla who is still at school. They live with the widow’s father in his grand country house. The father, who is ill, dies unable to communicate that he wants to change his will. Everything is left to his son, Sam, and Sam’s mean wife. The family of women, who have spent years looking after the father, are evicted by Sam and his wife and are forced to move to Madras. Before this, both elder daughters have developed a romantic interest: Saumya with Manohar, a budding filmmaker returned from America who wants to make his mark in Tamil cinema; and Meenakshi with Srikanth, a young businessman who is involved in some dodgy investments. Major Bala (who is disabled) and his uncle befriend the girls and their mother. Bala, who was a commando major in the Indian army, is shown in the first scene being blown up, resulting in the loss of his leg. He drinks too much as he feels sorry for himself….(wikipedia)

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The USA release is titled “I Have Found It.”

Watch the distraught Aishwarya Rai, as Meenakshi, achieveing her dream as a singer, but it means NOTHING because the man she loves is marrying another. But things aren’t so bad, for Mammootty, as Bala, is about to step in and make things right.

“Engae Enathu Kavithai” sung by K.S. Chitra & Srinivas, music by A. R. Rahman. Chitra’s voice is one of my favorites! Just listen to its beauty:
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Thanks to youtuber guru8537 for the video that includes an English translation. Look what BollyWhat? has to say about it. Lyrics in Tamil.

And if you’re interested in my favorite new internet obsession, it’s watching contestants on “Idea Star Singer 2007,” the Malayalam version of the Idols show.  I particularly like Vani Jayaram. Check out her version of today’s video: “Engae Enathu Kavithai”

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I’d never heard of Silk Smitha until seeing this video on another blog the other day. Watch the video about her HERE, it even includes a glimpse of Rajinikanth!

Pratibhaa, Chennai: She was 220px-silk_smitha.jpgthe Helen down South at a time when South Indian heroines were slowly emerging out of their saris. Silk Smitha scorched the big screen with her item numbers. Eleven years after her tragic death, she is back on the silver screen. Her last film before her death in 1996 – Thangathamarai is getting ready for a release this Pongal, and the producer is hoping for a great opening. “Her height, her body structure and the look she had in her eyes is what endeared her to the audience. So many other actors have their films releasing after their death, they all have fans, but as far as Silk Smitha is concerned all the people are her fans,” says Director and Producer, Thangathamarai, Tirupatiraja. Smitha made an entry into films through Veenayum Naadamum but it was after the character in Vandichakram that she got ‘Silk’ pre-fixed to her name. She’s done over 200 films in all South Indian languages and even years after she’s gone her fan base remains intact. “She’s not just a bomb. She’s a good actress too,” says a fan. Another fan adds, “In her Malayalam film Spadikam, she gives Bipasha Basu competition.” Though she did roles that portrayed her like a sex bomb, she’s proved herself to be a reasonable good actress with films like Moondraam Pirai and Alaiygal Oyvathillai. And whatever be the reason, the fact remains that even 11 years after her death, her fans haven’t forgotten her. (“Silk Smitha’s Coming to Charm You,” indiowo.com)

Then I looked around and had the luck of finding this gem.  It’s a bit PG-13, but it’s worth a watch.  Not sure of the movie, but the actor with Silk Smitha is Vijayakanth:

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With Bhool Bhulaiyaa under my belt, I tracked back to see its real source and to compare the rajini5.jpgclimax scenes in the 3 other movies on which is was based

1. 1993, Malayalam = Manichitrathazhu

2. 2004, Kannada = Aaptamitra

3. 2005, Tamil = Chandramukhi starring Rajnikanth

4. 2007, Hindi = Bhool Bhulaiyaa

Stars in the films:

Manichitrathazhu

(Malayalam)

Aaptamitra (Kannada)

Chandramukhi (Tamil/Telugu)

Bhool Bhulaiya (Hindi)

Mohanlal Vishnuvardhan Rajnikanth Akshay Kumar
Suresh Gopi Ramesh Aravind Prabhu Ganesan Shiney Ahuja
Shobana Soundarya Jyothika Saravanan Vidya Balan
Vinaya Prasad Prema Nayantara Amisha Patel

In the Malayalam original, Shobhana enacted the role and it was a National Award winning performance for the Best Actress. In the Kannada version (Apthamitra), Soundarya one of the top South Indian actresses, played the key role, unfortunately, her last film before her fatal accident. In the Tamil version (Chandramukhi), Jyothika donned the role and was awarded best actress award by Tamil nadu Government. (wikipedia)

I like the Malayalam version for Shobhana’s dancing. I like the tragic dramatic aspect that the actress in Aaptamitra died, so this was her last role. And I like the crazy head rolling end of Chandramukhi. I like the production values of the Bhool Bhulaiyaa version. Which do you like the best?

Watch these 4 and compare, and enjoy:

1. Manichitrathazhu:

2. Aaptamitra:

3. Chandramukhi:

4. Bhool Bhulaiyaa:

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