Mera Gaon Mera Desh (1971) or Sholay Lite

As part of Beth Loves Bollywood‘s international mandate,  7 days of 70′s, a week-long festival of any and all things 70′s from Bollywood, I offer to you my readers, Mera Gaon Mera Desh (1970) somehing I like to call Sholay Lite!  
 


This film is a delightful mix of  some of the 70′s most delicious masala staples: orphans, dacoits, bandits, dancers, damsels in distress, amputated limbs, music by Laxmikant-PyarelalAnand Bakshi as lyricist,  playback singing by Lata Mangeshkar and Mohammad Rafi, and starring Dharmendra, Asha ParekhVinod Khanna, Laxmi Chhaya, and Jayant.

Now let me take you on a visual walk through Mera Gaon Mera Desh.  We start with Ajit (Dharmendra) as a pick pocket, caught and put on the stand, explaining his fate to the judge and jury…

Ajit gets a chance after serving a light sentance to start over in a small village to where he’s been summoned by  a one armed Hawaldaar-Major Jaswant Singh (Jayant).  Ajit carries a coin that he flips to help him make major life decisions, and it flipped to the side that made him agree to go to the little town. But why?  Why would the one armed man want orphan?

Maybe to help him with some farm work.  That seems to be the reason. Then Ajit hangs out partying with the villagers, and Jayant’s character doesn’t like this and dekh what happens:

Such ugliness! Such mean words!  That’s the limit!  So he tells Ajit to leave, but then has to change his mind:

Enter bad guy, dacoit, and bandit extrodinaire, Thakur gone bad, Jabbar Singh! I’m telling you Vinod Khanna was delicious in this part.  Look at the sideburns and the scoul on his face. Hot!

So as it turns out, the one armed guy sought Ajit for the village (gaon) not for farming alone, but instead to take the lead in fighting off the band of dacoits who have long been terrorizing the villagers. Luckily Ajit finds a double agent in Munnibai (Laxmi Chhaya) who was sent by Jabbar to find out about Ajit, but ends up falling for him instead.

Munni does her spy duty, finds out what’s going on in Jabbar Singh’s dacoit camp and reports back to Ajit.

Ajit informs the authorities, Munni’s mom get’s upset at her indiscretion because like all villagers she rears the wrath Jabbar Singh and his bandits.

In the song, Hai SharmaonLaxmi Chhaya‘s character alerts Ajit to what disguises the bandits are wearing to the fair so that he can catch them.


After some of his men are captured by police at the full moon fair, Jabbar Singh suspects a traitor among his flock and conducts a threatenging interrogation fitting a bandit.

Thing get a wee bit misogynistic.


Meanwhile, back in town, Asha Parekh’s character, Anju, freaks out when Hawaldaar-Major Jaswant Singh (one armed guy) is killed by the bandits. I love it when Asha breaks down. She of course needs a tight slap to the face in order to get a hold of herself.  To make matters worse, now poor munni is thought by Ajit to be responsible for the bandits’ attack on the gaon village.  So she’s once again subject to some man handling, and once again, things get just a tad mysoginistic.

Oh no he didn’t!  Ajit can verbally abuse her, choke her, shake her, and shove her down into the river two times, but what sets her over the edge is that he doesn’t understand that she did not betray him, and that she loves him!  He pushed her over the edge in so many ways, and now look at the face of a woman scorned! DEKH! LOOK AT IT!

Jabbar Singh cointinues with his dacoitery and kidnaps Anju to lure Ajit into his evil den, where he proceeds to tie them up for torture.  Any chance I get to screen cap a scene with the word enmity in it I do, so here:

NOW here is the scene and song that compelled me to see this film in the first place: Maar Diya Jaaye Ya Chhod Diya Jaaye, Bol Tere Saath Kya Sulook Kiya JaayeRaj and Pablo, the charming and lovely radio hosts of BBC Asian Network’s Love Bollywood,  posted this video from the film on their Facebook page. It starts off with Dharmendra tied to a pole getting slapped in the face, and that was only the beginning of this outlandish number, featuring him, Laxmi Chayya and Asha Parekh.

Spoiler moral message ending alert! In the end the lesson is learned: The village must take responsibility to self govern and not rely so heavily on the government, meaning it’s a joint effort, but this effort must first begins at the grassroots level.  As it’s said it takes a village to raise a child, and in this movie, it takes a village to eliminate a dacoit. So now that title makes more sense: Mera Gaon Mera Desh = My Village My Country.

EXTRA CREDIT:  Here’s why Mera Gaon Mera Desh can be called Sholay Lite

Since Asha freaks out so beautifully, I shall end on this note:

Check out all the other groovy 70′s week posts HERE and HERE.

Aaina (1977)

I had originally tried to order Aaina (1977) from Netflix, but got the 1993 version of Aaina instead, which I reviewed HERE.  I eventually did get the 1977 version of Aaina that stars Mumtaz and Rajesh Khanna.  I would not be tricked by Bollywood’s duplicate titles and miss out on my original plan to see the 1977 version!

Shalini (Mumtaz)  is a poor yet happy brahmin girl who spends her time laughing and smiling, despite her  family’s poverty.  Ashok (Rajesh Khanna) and Shalini like each other but are from different castes.  They tease each other and have a lot of fun, but ultimately they come to understand that society’s norms will keep them apart.

When Ashok notes that Shalini’s only sari is worn to the point of having holes, he buys her a new one.  Shalini’s mother (Nirupa Roy) lets her daughter know that she can not accept this sort of gift from a man because it would be shameful for the entire family.  I love how this lesson of  family honor is filmed with the characters on either side of the worn sari:

Things continue to worsen for the family when the dad’s evil sister, Janki (Lalita Pawar) comes with her daughter to live with the already financially stressed family.   Janki doesn’t do a thing to help out, in fact she just spends time going to frivolous Bollywood  movies and gossiping.  When Janki finds one of her starving nephews begging for food she fails to understand that her taking money to go to the movies has caused the problem since that money would otherwise go for food for the children. Then Shalini finds her mother one night mixing poison in with the food so the she can poison the family out of their misery.

The next obstacle is that one of Shalini’s brothers wants to go to medical school, so in an attempt to get a recommendation to insure his entry to the program, Shalini travels to the big city. She stays with some friends of the family in the a home with a large central split staircase, so often seen in Bollywood films, hai na?

Shalini’s connection to try and get the recommendation for her brother’s entry to medical school is a fraud, and the situation ends with her being raped, as represented by a mirror aaina being broken.  She then hears of another person who can help her get the medical school recommendation, who invites her home to meet his wife.

But the wife is not there, only her picture is on the wall, and this powerful man has the same nefarious interests in Shalini as the man who first violated her.

So this is how Shalini, a young Brahmin girl, eventually turns to prostitution to support her family. One night she’s enjoying the company of a client, and he discovers that she’s Brahmin like him.  Note the symbolism of the mirror aaina on the wall saying hey, why don’t you look at yourself first yaar, before you point any fingers.

Shalini points out the ridiculousness of his hypocrisy and returns his tight slap to her face with one to his face.  Ironically, later in the movie when Shalini returns home to pay for and attend both her sister and brother’s weddings, who turns out to be the groom for her sister?  Not to spoil things, but it’s this creep here!

I learned from Suhan, a commenter on my 1992 Aaina post, that Laaga Chunari Mein Daag (2007) pulled from the 1977 Aaina.

This one comes out smelling of mothballs, like a wedding dress stored for decades in an attic trunk. Not surprising, since the plot is vintage 1977 from Aaina, and the 1995 Marathi film Doghi. (Hindustan Times).

If you’ve seen LCMD, perhaps like me you remember once Rani Mukerji became a high class call girl, she lived in a super deluxe apartment in Mumbai.  This was the only shot of that apartment I could find, but you get a general idea of its sleek, modern look.

Like Rani Mukerji’s character in Laaga Chunari Mein Daag,  Shalini also gets a fantastic place to live thanks to her profession.  I’m not saying it’s a good trade off, but it sure is a cool place.  One of my favorite parts of the film was when Shalini got a visitor, she would push a buzzer on the table and a curtain would automatically pull open, revealing the client behind the door. Check it out:

Sometimes it was a shock just who would stop by, like in this case, her friend Ashok from back home who told everyone he died in the war.  After knowing he could never be with Shalini, Ashok faked his own death, but eventually years later fate brought him right to her door!

Is that double lucky kismat at work or what?  Not only does he get a prostitute, but she’s also the woman he loves!   What are the odds of THAT happening!?  Alas, Shalini is shocked and ashamed.  Don’t you love that torpedo/bullet bra she must be wearing under her shirt?

Despite her circumstances, Ashok understands and more importantly accepts her as she is, and wonders what could have been between the two of them and life hadn’t taken them on different paths.

Shalini returns home to give her family money and pay for her siblings weddings. A cute part of the movie was the film within the film where the village  watched stars Dharmendra and Neetu Singh film a song sequence to Jaane Kya Ho Jaye with playback singers Mohammed Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar.  This is scene cuts back and forth being picturized on filmi film stars and the “real” young couple in the film, Shalini’s sister and that scoundrel she’s engaged to, Shalini’s former client:

Shalini sacrifices herself to fund her family and is disgusted to return home only to  find her mother pregnant again!  There are already about 8 kids in the family. Of course her mother has no idea just what Shalini has done to earn money.

Seems word has gotten out around town about Shalini’s new job and her little sister points out how her music teacher (paid for by Shalini) was staring at her. Shalini flirts with idea of suicide to answer the question of her eternal suffering, but when she’s about to jump, she hears the sounds of her siblings calling to her.

So how do you think it all ends? If you’d like to know more, please go to see the plot summary by rAjOo.

I’d love to hear your impressions of Aaina too.

Izzat (1968) featuring Jayalalitha

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Izzat (1968) stars  Dharmendrain a double role playing brothers who don’t know they’re brothers until late in life. One is rich, the other poor; one dark, the other fair; one a land owner’s privileged son, the other an illegitimate  hard working student who’s just been orphaned.  There are no illegitimate children, only illegitimate parents!..doesn’t Amitabh or SRK scream that out in some film, maybe it’s Amitabh in Lawaaris?  Tell me if you know.  Fate brings the Dharmendrai together and wacky misunderstandings occur and vendettas are settled.  Here’s a plot summary courtesy of  the prolificrAjOo, but skip it if you don’t want spoilers.

After completing his college, dark-skinned Adivasi Shekhar returns home and finds that his mother, Savli, has passed away. Distraught, he is consoled by Father Abraham, who also tells him that his mother had an affair with wealthy Ramgarh-based Thakur Pratap Singh, who refused to marry her even after she became pregnant. Shekhar decides to avenge his humiliation and sets forth to expose Pratap. Upon arrival in Ramgarh, he finds that he has a fair-skinned look-alike half-brother, Dilip, as well as a sister, Neelu. Dilip meets him, hires him as an office staff person, and asks him to impersonate him in order to meet Deepa, the only daughter of wealthy Vinodbabu, and Shekhar agrees to do so. Shekhar meets Deepa and both are attracted to each other. Shekhar decides to tell her the truth about himself, and returns to Ramgarh. Once there, he finds history repeating itself as Dilip is in love with an Adivasi belle, Jhumki, but is refusing to marry her. Written by rAjOo (IMDB)

At the beginning of the film Shekhar who I will refer to as dark Dharmendra, since in the film they make a big deal about this dark skin, finds out about his mother’s tragic past, and his parentage.  That Thakur (Balraj Sahni) kaminey found his dark skinned, low caste villager good enough to sleep with, but once she was with child, he coldly accuses her of wanting his lakhs. Thakur is wrong, all she wants is his love, and ek chutki sindoor and blessings of the goddess.izzat.$

"Ek chutki sindoor!"

"Ek chutki sindoor!"

So Shekhar works himself into the fancy home of his father and finds that he’s got a fairer skinned half brother.
izzat.vendetta izzat.double Shekhar’s got some killing on his mind, but he also finds himself at a party.  What to do? Dharmendra sings at  the party, as Shekhar and they all think he’s his look alike rich brother,  Dilip.  Please take note of the bollywood balloons that decorate the party:izzat.balloonI suppose I should have been excited by Dharmendra and Tanuja’s performances  here (yawn), but for me this was  Jayalalitha‘s film.   It was the first time I’d ever seen her.  She plays a super spunky mountain girl, who likes that fancy Dharmendra character, fair-skinned Dilip, but he’s socially out of her reach, being wrong caste for her to desire, let alone acquire.  She can’t possibly marry up…or can she?  Take a good look at her, I think she can:
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The live wire  Jayalalitha of Izzat transformed herself into a  real life politician. It was the first time I’d seen her in a movie, and she was a Tamil star, so her part in a Hindi film was not the norm.  She also did some playback singing.

Prior to her venture into politics, she had a successful career in the Tamil film industry as an actress. She acted in the English language movie “Epistle” released in 1961 produced by Shankar Giri, son of former president of India Dr. V.V. Giri. Chinnada Gombe, her first film (in Kannada) was a major hit. Her first Telugufilm Manushulu Mamathalu made her famous. In 1972, she was honoured by the Tamil Nadu government with the award Kalaimamani. She has acted opposite Dharmendra in the Hindi Movie named Izzat. Her last film was Nadhiyai Thedi Vandha Kadal in the year 1980. (source)

Now that I know she’s an over achiever, I’m a bit suspicious of her, but after her performance in Izzat, I’d vote for her, no problem.  On a side note, I would be an extremely reckless voter in India, for that very reason. “Jaylalitha is on the ballot!?  She was soooo cute in Izzat, and what a dancer!” I’d check that ballot, not even caring about her politics simply because she was so cute in that film.  Good thing I can’t vote in India. In her role as Jhulki, she’s fearless, not afraid to love:

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She’s not afraid to defend herself against a dirtball goonda/thug/dacoit. This scoundrel has lusted after her and when he tries to forcefully move in, she delivers a tight slap to the face! Go girl!

izzat.slapI wasn’t able to find a version of the item number featuring Jayalalitha dancing with about 30 other women to the music Laxmikant Pyarelal and a lavish set, but I did find it as part of a set clips of the full movie uploaded on youtube. Now THIS is what I call an item number:

The beginning part of this number, which is not in the above clip can be seen about 8 1/2 minutes into this link.  This number was so lavish that I needed to screen cap some of it for the world to see.  Look how fantastic Jayalalithaa looks here.izzat.item.7izzat.item

Eventually that nasty Thakur gets his just rewards.  It was only a matter of time before karma catches up with him.izzat.tribalsWell, tribals will be tribals, so easily incited and ready to light a torch for justice.izzat.riotThough she had a small part, I was very taken with Laxmi Chhaya’s performance as a servant.  She’s a real mess here, but very hot, so I suppose she’s a hot mess. I just love the colors here, from the walls to her sari, to her make up. Fantastic!izzat.maid.2

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And as a nice touch, there was a cute little statue of Jesus, in front of some stylin’ flagstone.  I like my Jesus with flagstone, sort of how I like my coffee with mile and sugar. Now I’ve got to see more of Jayalalitha, so looks like there will have to be some more Tamil, Telegu and Kannada films are in my future. Now head over to Memsaab’s blog, to read her impressions of Izzat.

I am of your caste and a spinster too!

I often order the Hindi movies at my local library. If it’s Hindi, I order it! Sometimes I end up with rather odd things as was the case with Sabse Badi Ganga Ki Saugandh. Is this maybe a TV movie remake version of Ganga Ki Saugandh (1978)? Maybe the library thought it was ordering the real Ganga Ki Saugandh? Who knows what happened, but now I want to see the real Ganga Ki Saugandh, and after seeing the wonderful screen capture maybe YOU will want to see Sabse Badi Ganga Ki Saugandh, which is from either 2000, or 2003, and sometimes listed as 2004. Dharmendra is cast in the film playing the good cop fighting the dacoits, but I don’t find it in any of his filmographies, so I wonder if it’s from television. Plus the DVD reads Show World Television, which would indicate a television production. I can’t wait to go to India one day, driving around in my Tata vehicle, saying, “I am of your caste and a spinster too!” If you know anything about this campy film, do tell!

Speaking of Dharmendra and dacoits, see what MemsaabStory has to say about Pratiggya (1975).

Bob Dylan does Bollywood? “I Want You” from Life…in a Metro (2007)

bobdylan.jpgI love life with all its crazy twists and turns and surprises, just like Bollywood. And I love Life… in a Metro (2007). Within this movie there was such a surprise: hearing Minnesota’s own musical legend Bob Dylan. Minnesota is BFC headquarters, yet even sitting here in Minnesota I was blindsided by hearing Dylan in a Bollywood movie. At least it wasn’t him as a playback singer. Now THAT would really be wild! The scene with Dylan happened when Konkona Sen Sharma was at a pop (the Midwestern, Minnesotan term for “soda” or “cola”) machine. While she was trying to choose what drink to buy and day dreaming about a guy, the music in the background was Dylan’s “I Want You” so take a listen:

Thanks for the video thcarmine. Lyrics

Did I ever dream of posting a Bob Dylan tune here? Never! Kabhie ne! But such is the unexpected beauty of life. But back to what I’m here for: Bollywood! Filmfare mania continued! I’ve already posted about the winners for best actress and best female playback singer for the 53rd Annual Filmfare Awards here. Life… in a Metro was such a great movie and nabbed both best supporting actor awards for Irfan Khan and Konkona Sen Sharma.

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The cast was fantastic! It stars Shilpa Shetty, Kay Kay Menon, Konkona Sen Sharma, Sharman Joshi, Shiney Ahuja, Kangana Ranaut, Irfan Khan, and Dharmendra. It tells the tales of the individual and interrelated lives of seven people living in Mumbai. To find out a bit more go to the film’s website. Like I’ve said here before, I deal with the more superficial analysis of Bollywood films, so instead of a review, take in these nice images from the film:

Dharmendra’s character got to share the some of the wisdom of Bollywood:

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While watching I finally figured out why Shilpa Shetty‘s looks confused me: She’s what a a child of Tabu + Jennifer Aniston would look like, right? Hain na?

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I love Shiney Ahuja! We all know what this can really mean:

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And this is precisely WHY one must be careful when offered a “cup of coffee,” since such a proposition can sometimes turn out like this:

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Yes, I do love you too Shiney! But I also LOVE Irfan Khan! THIS is why he won the 53rd Annual Filmfare Award for best supporting actor:

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And you are looking good to me, Irfan. I LOVE Konkona Sen Sharma! THIS is why is why she won the 53rd Annual Filmfare Award for best supporting actress:

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That’a right girl! Tell him!

For more on the movie, check out The Bolly Blog.

Video of the Day: “Haan Ji Haan Maine Sharaab Pi Hai” from Seeta Aur Geeta (1972)

Like Nandini described in yesterday’s post, I’ve also had a blockbuster week of watching Bollywood movies. In the past week I’ve seen, Debshishu, King Uncle, Haathi Mere Saathi, Amar Akbar Anthony, Cheeni Kum, Guide, Seeta aur Geeta, and Jo Jeeta Wohi Sikander. It’s a rather bizarre mix of flicks. I’m drunk on this Bollywood binge, so today’s video fits the bill: “Haan Ji Haan Maine Sharaab Pi Hai” from Seeta aur Geeta. seeta_aur_geeta_1972_film_poster.jpg

Seeta aur Geeta (सीता औरगीता) is a 1972 Hindi film directed by Ramesh Sippy. The story is by Salim-Javed and the music by R.D. Burman. The story is about identical twins (played by Hema Malini) who are separated at birth and grow up with different temperaments. The twins then swap places (like The Prince and the Pauper). Hema’s two partners in the movie are played by Dharmendra and Sanjeev Kumar. Manorama excels in her role as the evil aunt who changes her tune after her arm is twisted (literally). (wikipedia)

Filmi geek has a nice write up on the movie. “Haan Ji Haan Maine Sharaab Pi Hai,” is sung by Lata Mangeshkar, with music by R.D.Burman, and lyrics by Anand Bakshi.

UsherRed‘s YouTube video is dubbed in Russian, which adds another layer to its already great appeal. In this clip poor Geeta, is set to get married, and is scheming to get out of it because she’s guilty that her fiancé mistakenly thinks she’s really Seeta. She trys to imagine the worst case senario, which involves a tight slap to the face, and wiggles her way out of that situation, or does she? Here’s how she figures she’ll be able to sidestep the shaadi:

I’m particularly fond of this scene because I had a pair of white patten leather go-go boots I wore when I was about five years old, just like Hema is sporting here.   It’s also impressive that she never spills even a drop of her sharaab in this scene.

Video of the Day: “Yeh Dosti” from Sholay (1975) in honor of veteran Bollywood filmmaker G.P. Sippy, dead at age 93

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Veteran Bollywood filmmaker G.P. Sippy dies at age 93.

Here’s a video about his life and his passing.

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G.P. Sippy cremated Mumbai (PTI): Veteran Bollywood producer-director G P Sippy, who had become a household name with his 1975 blockbuster “Sholay”, was cremated here on wednesday. Sippy, who died on Tuesday night, was cremated at 11.45 am at the electric crematorium in Chandanwadi, Marine Lines. His family members and close relatives were present for the funeral. 93-year-old Sippy was suffering from age-related ailments for past few months. A scion of a rich Sindhi family, Sippy’s career got to a flying start with the film “Marine Drive” (1955) and went on to produce “Adl-e-e-Jahangir” with Pradeep Kumar, Meena Kumari and Durga Khote as its star cast, in the same year. The 50s and 60s was a hectic time for Sippy, with his banner producing and directing flicks like “Shrimati 420,” “Chandrakant,” “Light House,” “Bhai Behan” and “Andaaz”. In 1972, Sippy, along with son Ramesh, made super hit “Seeta aur Geeta” with Hema Malini in a double role. However, the movie for which he will be always remembered is “Sholay” which boasted of an impressive star cast that included Sanjeev Kumar, Amitabh Bachchan, Jaya Bachchan, Hema Malini and Dharmendra. Later on, he also produced films like “Saagar” (1985), “Raju Ban Gaya Gentleman” (1992), “Aatish” (1992), “Zamaana Deewana” (1995) which were also well-received by the audience. Sippy was the chairman of the Film and TV Producers Guild of India on four occasions in the 70s, 80s and 90s. He also bagged the Filmfare awards in 1968 and 1982. (The Hindu)

To honor G.P. Sippy‘s life, our video today is from his massive hit movie, Sholay, starring Dharmendra, Amitabh Bachchan, Hema Malini, Sanjeev Kumar, Jaya Bhaduri and Amjad Khan. The song is “Yeh Dosti” by R. D. Burman, sung by Kishore Kumar and Manna Dey.

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Watch the good dosto, Amitabh and Dharmendra here:

Thanks to elitesurfer for the YouTube video.

LYRICS in Hindi with English translation

Video of the Day: “Mehbooba O Mehbooba” from Sholay, 1975

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Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving with today’s video starring Helen dancing to “Mehbooba Mehbooba,” sung by R. D. Burman from Sholay. Here are the LYRICS.

180px-y_gabbar_thakur.jpgSholay (Hindi: शोले, Urdu: شعلے) (advertised in English as fire is the biggest blockbuster in the history of Bollywood, India’s Hindi film industry. It was released in 1975 and starred Dharmendra, Amitabh Bachchan, Hema Malini, Sanjeev Kumar, Jaya Bhaduri and Amjad Khan as the timeless villain, Gabbar Singh. It is the highest grossing film of all time in India. It has earned Rs. 2,36,45,00,000 equivalent to US$ 60 million, after adjusting for inflation. In 1999, BBC India declared it the “Film of the Millennium”; in 2005, the judges of the 50th annual Filmfare awards awarded it with a special award called Filmfare Best Film of 50 YearsIndiatimes Movies ranks the movie amongst the Top 25 Must See Bollywood Films. When first released the film was declared a commercial disaster. Word of mouth convinced movie-goers to give the film a chance and soon it became a box-office phenomenon. It ran for 286 weeks straight (more than five years) in one Mumbai theatre, the Minerva. Sholay racked up a still record 60 golden jubilees across India, and doubled its original gross over reruns during the late 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. Sholay was the first film in the history of Indian cinema to celebrate silver jubilee (25 weeks) at over a hundred theatres across India. To date, more than 1,100 prints of Sholay are in circulation-the highest number for any Hindi film. (wikipedia)

Video of the Day: “Om Shanti Om” from KARZ, 1980

I’ve never seen Karz (1980), but I have seen the cool video clip here, “Om Shanti Om,” with Rishi Kapoor  (playback singer Kishore Kumar) and remember thinking the first time I saw it, “Hey, those are the WRONG kind of Indians in this video!” I was delighted to see this same tune picturized in the beginning of Om Shanti Om (2007), which I had the pleasure of viewing tonight with some BFC members: Nandini-ji, Vik-ji, Inderjit-ji, aur Lisa-ji. Here are the LYRICS so you can sing along with Rishi/Kishore.  “Hey, tumne kabhi kisi se pyaar kiya? Kabhi kisi ko dil diya? Maine bhi diya! La la la la, la la la la…”
Groove to this friends:

Video by by bearsurfer

 

Om Shanti Om stars:

See it here and now in Minneapolis: http://www.brookdalecinemas.com/

Here was the best part of the movie, the special appearances cast, and all I can keep thinking is, “How could I have missed Sridevi!? Look, Dharmendra!om11.jpg

Here’s a fellow WordPresser review of Om Shanti Om that’s worth a read:

Picture abhi baaki hai, mere dost – a First Day First Show review of Om Shanti Om

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