Searching for Bollywood in Spain, Portugal, and Morocco

I’m back! I took a trip in earlier in the month to Spain, Portugal, and Morocco.  While I was there, I kept my eyes peeled for any signs of the Indian film industry.  So allow me to provide you with data from my trip.  In Spain, I looked around for  crews filming  Zoya Akhtar‘s Zindagi Milegi Na Dubara, but no luck seeing its stars stars Hrithik Roshan, Katrina Kaif, Abhay Deol, Kalki Koechlin or Farhan Akhtar, but maybe they saw me.  I was in the Andulician zone where they were said to be filming, but no luck!  The closest I got to Bollywood in Spain was a fabulous commercial I saw in Madrid starring Arjun Rampal being inexplicably jilted by Nicole Kidman. You will also notice little Rubina Ali from Slumdog Millionaire in the commercial. Take a look:

Well I do have to admit that those Schweppes’ citrus drinks are delicious, so maybe I understand a little. For a better look at the commercial, click HERE.

Next off to Portugal, where on this street in Lisbon:

I met Tibetans in a shop selling a great selection of Bollywood films.  I asked the shopkeeper who he liked most, but there were too many to mention, but he did say he found Saif Ali Khan arrogant.

Look closely at the solid collection, I  was impressed to see Dance Dance (1987), look behind the screen in the second photo here:

No this is a stretch, but I’ll include it anyway, also in Lisbon I found this colorful restaurant in Bairro Alto district.

What caught my eye was the couple dancing with the sticks, which reminded me of Dandiya Raas, hai na? See them dancing with the sticks, just below the guitar?

As you can see I had to ammend my search for Bollywood, to a search for Indian-ish stuff.  Moving on to southern Portugal, I reached the city of Olhão in the Algarve.  There was another shop selling Bollywood DVDs and Indian clothing,  and my lodging was across from this restaurant, which I was told to avoid, by several different reliable sources.

One of my sources saw the restaurant’s  drunk and stumbling cook, and she said “If he can barely stand and speak, how could he cook!?”  So no Sindu pizza (see menu board in photo) for me!

But the Algarve wasn’t that disappointing as far as Bollywood goes, since I saw this dashing lifeguard on the beach of  Culatra Island, and if my life were a Bollywood movie, one day he’ll realize my feelings for him and he’ll find me!  I’m playing hard to get for the time being, since I only snapped his photo(s) from afar, much like a stalker, and never spoke to him.  He doesn’t even know I’m alive, but one day, we will be together!  Just like in the movies!

Maybe you’d like a closer look at him, and I’m sorry that other guy was in the way! He really ruined everything, because it looks like the lifeguard was trying to look for me, but this guy in the blue wouldn’t stop talking! Idjit!

Next I was off to Morocco.  I was excited to read some of the following in Lonely Planet’s Morocco book

Bollywood in the Sahara ‘Namaste, mohabbat!’ (Greetings, my love!) If you’re South Asian, you may be met with a warbling chorus of Hindi hellos even in remote Moroccan oases.  If this strikes you as a scene straight from a movie, you’re exactly right: for 50 years, Morocco has been completely besotted with Bollywood.  When Morocco gained its independence in the 1950s, the anti-colonial themes and social realism of Indian cinema struck a deep chord.  Morocco’s small but influential resident Indian community began distributing Indian films that soon earned a loyal local following.  Top Moroccan acting talents were recruited to dub and subtitle Indian movies into Darija and French, and generations of  ‘Bollyphiles’ learned to sing along with the movie themes in Hindi.  Not surprisingly Bollywood stars were among the first honourees at the Marrakesh Film Festival, and at open-air screenings in the Djemaa el-Fna, there’s no mistaking the Indian-import crown favorites.  In 2005, more than a third of the movies shown on  Morocco’s 105 screens were Bollywood films, and 264 Hindi  films were screened in Morocco in the first six months of 2006. Among the biggest Moroccan marque draws are Salman Khan, Aishwarya Rai, and Shah Rukh Khan – a 2008 Casablanca screening of Chalte Chalte (2003) starring Shah Rukh Khan with an in-person appearance by co-star Rani Murkherjee drew 50,000 devoted fans.  After half a century of ardent admiration, Bollywood is finally returning the love: in 2008, two Bollywood productions filmed scenes in Morocco.  While you’re visiting, maybe you can be an extra in the mountain-top dance sequence… (pg. 61, Feb. 2009 edition source )

No such luck for me, I didn’t get any extra work, I saw no films screened in the Djemaa el-Fna, instead it looked like this during my visit:

And from the other direction it looked like this, the Koutoubia Mosque is in the background, and that crescent moon was out, since the place is Muslim and it was Ramadan.

I can imagine what an excellent venue the Djemaa el-Fna would make for an open air screening of a Bollywood film, can’t you?  In Fes, Morocco, I saw some halwa,  and what looks like  a gori extra in the medina, as as pointed out by BollywoodFanGirl (ChristyRae on twitter).

I also saw another gori extra in a shop in Fez. What’s her story?  She’s a mess!

While in Chefchaouen, Morocco, I did see this colorful Indian gear, but that’s as close to Bollywood as I got:

On my last evening in Madrid, I was flipping through television stations in my hotel room and saw this handsome guy on  Intereconomia who I thought resembled Rahul Khanna.  Take a look…

Now look at the real Rahul Khanna:

See the resemblence?

In the duty free shop of terminal 1 in Madrid’s  Barajas Airport, I found Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, shhhh, don’t tell anyone.

I’m so lucky to be able to travel, yet I’m always very happy to get home and relax to travel the world through films.

Oprah interviews Aishwarya Rai & Abhishek Bachchan, 9.28.09

A couple months back I caught Anil Kapoor on a rerun of Martha Stewart.  Anil-ji appeared on The Martha Stewart show early last year as did Aishwarya Rai. Dosto, dekh at the ladies get their craft on:

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Here’s a clip from Aish’s 2/2009 Martha Stewart appearance:

Aish is set to be on US TV again, but this time I know about an appearance in time to see the first run of the show and to warn you, and this time she’s on Oprah.

Aishwarya Rai and her husband, Abhishek Bachchan, will  make their first interview appearance together in the US on Oprah this Monday, September 28, 2009.

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For a  previes of the show, click HERE.  Aishwarya was also been on Oprah back in February of 2007, which you can see HERE.

I’m back from Iran! My foray into Iranian cinema: Part I- director Tahmineh Milani

Tahmineh_MilaniHey Bollywood Fans!  I’ve been in Iran, well more precisely watching some Iranian cinema. With all the recent turmoil in Iran, I thought the least I could do is watch some of their movies. I was inspired to do this after seeing NBC’s special Behind the veil: Inside Iran which included an interview with director Tahmineh Milani.

Over and over again in Iran, we meet women who are challenging the status quo. Like filmmaker Tahmineh Milani.

Tahmineh Milani: I believe this way. This is the– best way to change people.

Milani is one of the most popular and respected directors in Iran. She’s won numerous international awards for her films, most of which are about the unseen lives of middle-class women in Iran.

Tahmineh Milani: They accept their situation. And they don’t talk, they don’t protest. But they suffer.

Her movies have to be cleared by censors. At least three have been banned. She says that earlier in her career, she challenged the country’s top censor.

Tahmineh Milani: I went there and he start to– accuse me. And he said, “We will bring you and we will– beat you– here.”

Ann Curry: Whip you.

Tahmineh Milani: Yes, whip you. Yes, yes, yeah, whip you.

She was not beaten, but pregnant with twins at the time, she says the stress took its toll. She gave birth prematurely. Her daughter lived.

Tahmineh Milani: And after two, three days my son died.

Ann Curry: Why didn’t you stop your work?

Tahmineh Milani: Because I believe my way. Because, I believe– I can be useful in my society, because this is my society. This is my country. We really love Iran. I choose to live here and I want to keep this place.

In 2001, she made a film called “the hidden half” about a woman unjustly sentenced to death. Ironically, after the film was released, Milani was arrested and jailed and faced the death penalty herself.

Ann Curry: They accused you of being anti-God.

Tahmineh Milani: Yeah, and three–

Ann Curry: Other charges.

Tahmineh Milani: –more dangerous than these.

She says she was given a stern warning:

Tahmineh Milani: “We are going to kill you to be good lesson to another people.”

Ann Curry: They said that to you? They said, “We’re gonna kill you”?

(source and more of the interview HERE. There is also video of the 6 part special HERE.)

So far I’ve seen Milani’s Do Zan (Two Women), 1999; Nimeh-ye Penhān (aka The Hidden Half), 2001; and Vākonesh-e Panjom (aka The Fifth Reaction), 2003 and I’ll share a bit about each here.  It was interesting that all three films starred Niki Karimiand in each film her character was named Fereshteh, though they were each separate unrelated characters. I found that Fereshteh is a Persian name for Angel.

dozanSimilar to many Indian films, every the Iranian films all started off with a dedication to God.  Since God watches movies, I’m sure he/she appreciates the shout outs. I like that merging of art and religion, but I don’t like at American music awards shows how artists thank Jesus, or the Lord, or Jesus my Lord and Savior, I suppose because I’m some sort of hypocrite, but I digress. I should start every post, “In the name of God.”

 

342px-Two-WomanDo Zan (Two Women), from 1999 was, you guesses it, the story of 2 woman who met in college in Tehran and how both of their lives took different courses over the years.

Two Women charts the lives of two promising architecture students over the course of the first turbulent years of the Islamic Republic, creating a portrait of traditions that conspire to trap women and stop them from realizing their full potential. The film won the best screenplay award at Iran’s Fajr Film Festival in 1999 as well as Best Actress for Niki Karimi‘s part in the Taormina Film Festival. (source)

Roya (Marila Zare’i) and Fereshteh (Niki Karimi) are total BFFs, but the revolution and some domineering men really get in the was of things.

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Well looks like the more things change the more they stay the same, hai na?  So if the political situation weren’t enough, Fereshteh is being stalked by a psycho.

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dozan.love dozan.acid

dozan.getawayIt’s not quite love, since he follows her with a knife and threatens her and her friends.  Long story short, she goes back to her home town to avoid the maniac, but he hunt her down. One day while he follows stalks Fereshteh, she drives into a group of kids and kills one of them.  This causes her family disgrace, even though it wasn’t her fault at all. To the “rescue” in court comes man number two, and poor  Fereshteh’s dad marries her off to this guy, who I think is just as bad as the stalker.

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Her mom can’t help her, since her dad and men in general run the show. Now here’s a snap from their little nikkah (wedding) ceremony.  I suppose you may know that the women and girl in the background are doing that happy little screaming thing, but I interpreted it as yawning: they wanted to see a proper Indian wedding ala Bollywood.  See how dull:

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So the husband is a real tyrant and controls Fereshteh as much as possible:

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Sort of makes the stalker seem romantic by comparison.  Eventually she wants out of the abusive marriage and goes to her family for support without luck.

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Well I’d say hey, why not help your daughter, after all you’re the one who married her off to that creep.

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hiddenhalfNext I saw  Nimeh-ye Penhān(aka The Hidden Half) from 2001 and if you’re expecting a happier story than Do Zan, give up now.

An official is sent from his home in Tehran to hear the final appeal of a woman sentenced to death, a political prisoner. The official’s wife of nearly 20 years, Fereshteh Samimi, writes him a letter to read when he reaches the hotel – the story of her student days during the revolution of 1978. We see the story in flashbacks as he reads: she leaves her province on scholarship, joins a Communist youth group, avoids arrest, and comes under the sway of a suave older man, Roozbeh Javid, a literary-magazine editor. As she tells her husband about the hidden half of her life, Fereshteh asks that he listen to the woman facing execution, a woman and therefore one of Iran’s hidden half. (source)

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Fereshteh meets an older man, Javid (Mohammad Nikbin),  and there’s a mutual attraction, but despite being an intellectual, he patronizes her.

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She asks the party leader the official view on romantic love:

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She gets tired of wearing the seemingly required communist outfits and again questions the party official.

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One of Mr. Javid’s associates helps set Fereshteh straight about the struggle:

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I believe the  movie’s title, the Hidden Half,  not only referred to Fereshteh’s earlier life that her husband didn’t know about but also the (hidden) wife of the older man who pursues her. Later in life Javid and Fereshteh meet again.  He speaks to her about love and to me she looks a bit like Aishwarya Rai here, right?

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5thReactionFinally, the last Milani movie I saw was Vākonesh-e Panjom (aka The Fifth Reaction) from 2003.

Fereshteh loses her home and her two sons after her husband’s accidental death when Hadj Safdar, her stubborn and powerful father-in-law, forces her to return to her parents. She is faced with the loss of her visitation rights when Hadj plans to send his grandchildren to live in a remote town. With the help of her circle of women friends she tries to take them beyond his reach, but in a patriarchal society it is hard to find a safe haven. (source)

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Fereshteh is out with the gals in Tehran talking about their teaching jobs.  Her friends are encouraging Fereshteh to stop mourning her husband.

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Her friend also is talking about how great her own relationship with her husband is, but opps! He walks into the same restaurant with his young secretary.

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And then comes the attempted tight slap to the face. How dare she question her husband! Luckily the owner of the place is a true gentleman and sends the crazed, tyrannical husband on his way.

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Fereshteh’s father in law, Hadj Safdar, played by Jamshid Hashempur, tells her that she must either marry her brother in law now that she’s a widow, or he will take her two sons from her.  He believes  she’d no doubt be a temptation to his other son and  would work in conjunction with the devil.

5thReaction.stay 5thReaction.devil

Fareshteh cannot fathom marrying her brother in law, or leaving her children, so she escapes town with her sons. 

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It becomes a game of cat and mouse between Fareshtah and her father in law.  He tries to track her and her sons down all around Tehran and into the countryside.  Notice like many a Bollywood villains how Hadj wears more that one ring, which I see as a bad sign! Furthermore, whenever you see a pinkie ring, run!  It’s never good.

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The other Iranian films I’ve  seen are  10  by director Abbas Kiarostami, and Baran by Majid Majidi, which I’ll cover in a post in the next day or two…then it’s back to Bollywood yaar!  Have you seen any of these films or other Iranian films?  Let me know.

“AIDS Sutra:Untold Stories from India” with a touch of Bollywood

http://sajablogs.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451dd1469e20105361b738b970b-800wiFor time-pass I watch a lot of movies and I also read books.  I suppose it’s normal to find stories about films in books about India, since the film industry infiltrates the culture. Even in this anthology on the serious subject of AIDS,  I was able to find a bit of very uplifting Bollywood material.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is pleased to announce the publication of AIDS Sutra: Untold Stories from India, a landmark collection of essays that presents a complex and gripping picture of the disease. Sixteen of India’s most well-known literary writers go on the road to tell the story of people affected by the epidemic and the stigma that surrounds them. “This book reveals the human side of the disease,” write Bill and Melinda Gates in their introduction to this groundbreaking anthology. (source)

Bhoot Ki Kahaanian by Jaspreet Singh references Taare Zameen Par (2007).

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 AIDSsutra.TZP.1

AIDSsutra.TZP

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Umrao_Jaan_movie_poster

 

Return to Sonagachi by Sunil Gangopadhyay presented a delightful dilemma: where on earth do we hide the whisky?  I bet it was Johnnie Walker.  Read on to see how the dilemma reminded me a bit of Umrao Jaan (1981) and (2006):

 

 

 

 

AIDSsutra.Sonagacchi.p158

Now here’s the Umrao Jaan-ish part:

AIDSsutra.Sonagacchi.p160

(p.158)  

See!  A poetry writing prostitute with a heart of gold, just like Umrao Jaan.

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Love in the Time of Positives by Nalini Jones baghban00 describes how Baghban (2003), and in particular the part played by  Salman Khan, ended up saving someone’s life.

On the day he planned to die, he decided to spend his last afternoon at the movies. Basavaraj described the film he saw at great length-a family drama starring Amitabh Bachchan called Baghban. It is the story of loving parents who give everything they have to their son and look froward to a happy old age.  But their children have grown selfish, caught up in their own concerns, and the parents are left destitute until an unlikely saviour, a street boy the couple had adopted and educated, comes to their rescue.  Sitting alone in the theater, Basavaraj began to worry about this own parents. He realised he was their only son, their best hope for ‘a good old age’. He wanted to be like the adopted boy in the film, the only one who doesn’t forget what he owes his family.  Basavaraj went home, threw out the pills, pored away the alcohol, and cast himself as the unlikely saviour- the son who is secretly HIV positive. (source p.320)

baghban

 

So if you’ve seen Baghban, I suppose the credit would go to Salman Khan  for saving the life of Basavaraj! Who would have thought!?  I wonder if Salman-ji knows about this.

 

The Daughters of Yellamma by William Dalrymple includes an Amitabh Bachchan siting!  In some parts of India young girls are “married” or dedicated to the temple goddess as prostitutes.  Dalrymple interviews one of the women and she recalls the time she lived in Bombay:

I ate fabulous biryani at the Sagar Hotel and once when I was in the streets I saw Amitabh Bachchan pass by in his car. (p. 226)

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As much as I enjoyed to Sunil Gangopadhyay’s piece, I enjoyed The Last of the Ustaads by Aman Sethi which both mentions and pays a great tribute to Gadar, Ek Prem Katha (2001).  Maybe I loved Sethi’s piece so much because Gadar is one of my favorite movies.

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Questioning the plight of truck drivers in India and their higher tendency to have HIV than the general population, Sethi interviews a truck driver:

Is it just ‘modern life’? When finding answers to sudhcomplex questions in a country infested with faux holy men, one must turn to the sole oracle of truth—Bollywood super hit film Gadar: Ek Prem Katha(Gadar: A Love Story), Tara Singh the truck driver, played by trucker demigod Sunny Deol, is asked a poignant question by Partition refugee Sakina, played by Amisha Patel.  ‘Tara Singhji,’ she asks as sh expertly ties hi turban, ‘why don’t you get married?’ Tho this, Tara Singh shakes his turbaned head, and gives her an answer that made practically every truck driver in India nod his head approvingly and say ‘Wah!’ ‘Madamji,’ says Tara Singh, ‘I live in Khana Buddur; today my truck is parked here, but tomorrow I might  be in Delhi. After that why would anyone want to marry a truck driver?’ Thought the movie is set in 1947, Tara Singh’s question touches upon an issue that is relevant even today.  Truck drivers aren’t particularly discriminated against when it comes to marriage partners; but some of the younger drivers I spoke with said that finding partners was becoming harder and harder.  I watched Gadar on the recommendation of Sanjay and some of his friends Played out against the backdrop of the Partition riots in 1947 in the border states of India and Pakistan, Gadar tells the tale of how a heroic Jat-Sikh truck driver rescues a wealthy Muslim girl from a rampaging mob; wins her trust, marries her, rescues her once more–this time from her rampaging father–and finally settles down, in a happy ending. While several films have had their heroes careen up and down highways in trucks, the heroes. are rarely truck drivers;l the truck just happens to be the closest vehicle at had to make good their escape, rescue their lovers, or run over their enemies.  Gadar is perhaps the only mainstream hit in which the protagonist is a truck driver who proves to be a good husband, father, patriot, and all round nice guy.  Unfortunately, Gadar  too starts with Tara Singh accepting that fate has dealt him a poor hand by making him a truck driver.  He obligingly sings and dances and plays the part of the happy truck driver, but he understands the distance between him and the object of his desire.  As he says, ‘Even if I wanted to, I can’t touch the moon, can I?’ The rest of the plot is a story of redemption–of proving that truck drivers are honourable, powerful , and patriotic.  Why does truck driving lack izzat?  Why are truck drivers victims of negative stereotypes?  Is it class? Is it their association with a high-risk behavior group? Does, in fact, being categorised as  a high-risk group stigmatise them even further? From Gadar to their portrayal in the Indian press, truckers are regarded as rough and ready and reckless, dirty and dissolute.  Prone to drink, driving accidents–and now disease. (p. 306-7)

For more about the book,  read a review  from The Telegraph, Calcutta India, and another from The Indian Journal of Medical Ethics. Listen to the NPR Podcast on the book: ‘AIDS Sutra’ Challenges Widespread Denial In India’

Also, if you want to get filmy with it, here’s something else.

The AIDS Jaago (AIDS Awake) project is four short dramatic films which aim to dismantle myths and raise awareness about HIV/AIDS. These films were funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and made by acclaimed Indian filmmakers Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding; The Namesake), Vishal Bhardwaj, Santosh Sivan and Farhan Akhtar. Designed to use the immense power of moviemaking to wake people up about AIDS, the project was the brainchild of Mira Nair and was produced by her company Mirabai Films. (source)

Watch for Free on Jaman HERE

other Bollywood Movies on HIV

Bollywood Insider for May, 2009

Here’s the latest chugli from Suzi Mann with Bollywood Insider for May, 2009:

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Click on the links below to find out more.

Bollywood Insider Friday 01 May 2009Tributes from stars to Feroz Khan, IIFA venue and nominations announced, Shahrukh takes IPL break to cast vote

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Bollywood Insider Friday 15 May 2009:  Our Insiders at Cannes bring us Aishwarya and Abishek on the red carpet – IPL filling movie void with Shahrukh, Shilpa, and Preity

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Bollywood Insider Friday 22 May 2009:  This week in Cannes, we ask Barbara Mori and Hrithik Roshan about ‘those’ rumours, and speak to them about all things ‘Kites’

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Bollywood Insider Friday 29 May 2009:  Bipasha Basu gets together with Billy Zane – Kal Kisne Dekha – It’s a Wonderful Afterlife

Filmfare Bollywood for Minneapolis for the next 5 weekends!

FILMFARE AWARDS 2008 Film Festival

at Brookdale 8 theater starting  this weekend!

For 5 weekends – every Saturday @ 3:30!

from March 28th to April 25th, 2009

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Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye! – Saturday, March 28th @ 3:30 PM

·        Best Actor Critics – Manjot Singh

·        Best Dialogue – Manu Rishi

 

Rock On – Saturday, April 4th @ 3:30 PM

·        Best Story – Abhishek Kapoor,

·        Best Actress Critics – Shahana Goswami

·        Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Arjun Rampalfilmfare-award-statue

·        Best Debut – Farhan Akhtar

·        Outstanding Performance of the year – Purab Kohli

 

Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na – Saturday, April 11th @ 3:30 PM

·        Best Debut – Imran Khan

·        Best Music – A R Rahman

·        Outstanding Performance of the year – Prateik Babbar

 

Fashion – Saturday, April 18th @ 3:30 PM

·        Best Actress – Priyanka Chopra

·        Best Actress in a Supporting Role – Kangana Ranaut

 

Jodha Akbar – Saturday, April 25th @ 3:30 PM

·        Best Film

·        Best Director – Ashutosh Gowariker

·        Best Actor – Hrithik Roshan

Watch all 5 films for $10 or each film for $3. Hey those are recession friendly prices, hai na?

Also showing this weekend and or in the coming weeks:

slumdog-millionaire-poster-full1   delhi62

TIMES & DIRECTIONS

Bollywood Insider: Catching up for 2009!

Here’s a better late than never update on Bollywood Insider, with my favorite correspondant of Bollywood chugli and news, Suzi Mann.  Many of the links I’ve added here before from ITN/Bollywood Insider  through youtube eventually disappear.  Hopefully these newer links from AOL,  Bebo,  Joost, and MySpace will last. 
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Enjoy the updates yaar:
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India was rocking hai! I’m back & I saw many balloons.

india0809-5151india0809-004Sat Sri Akal! I’ve returned from my whirlwind trip to India. It was my best trip ever and I’ll be posting about it more in the future and post photos on picaweb soon and provide the link if you’re interested. Imagine my delight when I boarded the plane and heard the man in the next row saying things like Iowa, professor, Hindi. Like a stalker I said, “Hey, are you Philip of Philip’s Fil-ums?!” india0809-2361Well of course it was him, since real life mimics Bollywood and is full of coincidences. Professor Lutgendorf kindly tolerated my many questions and it was a treat to speak with him. I’ve included a photo of us on the plane in Delhi. And to add a perfect ending to my trip, I arrived home to see that generous Beth Loves Bollywood had sent me a movie in the mail! So you can see that Bollywood bloggers started and ended my trip. I was able to attend a wedding, or as the Indians say, a function in Ludhiana. In addition to the marvelous array of wedding functions, I saw the Golden Temple in Amritsar (and drank the holy H2O), the Taj Mahal, the Red Fort in Agra, Fatepur Sikri (Hrihik and Aish’s pad in Jodhaa Akbar dude!) and Sikandra. I ate great food and was treated like a rani. Thanks India! Here’s a little visual proof of my visit:

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india0809-234That was the M. S.  Anand Band of Lahore’s rendition of Aaje Nachle, complete with a Balloon Walla in the background. Now if you’d like to hear something very beautiful, click HERE, HERE, and HERE to listen to one of Ludhiana’s most famous citizens, the late Ishmeet Singh on Star Voice of India.

Amitabh Bachchan to leave hospital in few days!

A belated Happy Birthday to Amitabh Bachchan!

After heading over to his blog, I noticed it was rather quiet, but a quick internet search revealed that he’s been ill. I know it’s very upsetting to hear, but even though he’s ill, Amitabh wants you to calm down, see:

MUMBAI (Reuters) – Leading Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan will be discharged in a few days from a Mumbai hospital where he was admitted after complaints of abdominal pain, a hospital official said on Sunday. Bachchan, who turned 66 on Saturday, was rushed to the hospital where he had undergone surgery in 2005 for an intestinal condition, and was placed under observation. “He’s had a restful night and the tests do not show any abnormality,” said Dr. Narendra Trivedi, the vice president of the hospital. “He has responded well to our line of treatment and will be discharged in a few days,” he said. Dozens of fans and reporters kept an overnight vigil outside the hospital for Bachchan, who had been shooting for Hindi film “Teen Patti” till Friday. His actor son Abhishek, daughter-in-law Aishwarya and daughter Shweta were with him in the hospital. (Reuters)

Wishing Amitabh Bachchan all the best!

The reports say he’s responding well to treatment. In fact this is what he’ll be looking like soon, walking out of that hospital!

10/16/08 update: Read about Aamir Khan’s desire to visit Big B. HERE.

Bollywood Insider: Latest reports from August & September, 2008

 

Back with the newest Bollywood chugli is Bollywood Insider’s Suzi Mann.

Here’s what I was able to search out for August up through today. 

Enjoy dosto!

 

 

 

 

From